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Houstonian 1992
Student Life
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1992 - Student Life. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19684/show/19640.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1992 - Student Life. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19684/show/19640

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1992 - Student Life, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19684/show/19640.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1992
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Student Life
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1992_202.jpg
Transcript Sexual What? Thomas Hearings Bring Harrassment Out of the Dark Although not surprised by the Senate's confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court, may campus leaders remained troubledbytheupsetting,highly political confirmation process. In a 52 to 48 vote, the Senate appointed Thomas to replace the vacated Supreme Court seat of retired Justice Thurgood Marshall. Texas Democratic Sen. Lloyd Bentsen voted against Thomas and Republican Phil Gramm voted for the confirmation. UH student leaders and faculty, however, questioned the integrity of the confirmation proceedings. "I don't feel the Thomas hearings were taken care of very fairly, Mai Spickelmier, president of the UH's College Republicans, said. "I didn't feel they needed to drag Anita Hill through the mud to get dirt on Thomas. "It's been a mess and a waste of time," Spicklemier said. "And I don't think it changed the opinions of many senators." Television and radio audiences were captivated as senators considered the testimony of Hill, a University of Oklahoma law professor who vividly testified Thomas had sexually harassed her while she worked for him at the Department of Education and the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission. "The whole business was very offensive to lots of people," said James Herget, a professor of constitutional law at the UH Law Center. Herget said some people offended by the Senate Judiciary Committee's leaking of information about Hill's charges and the foul language used in the much- publicized hearings. "Most people have gotten a negative impression from the hearings," Herget said. "But the first part, before Hill's allegations, was the standard Supreme Court process that both Bork and Ginsburg (re- jected Supreme Court nominees) went through." Herget said politics may always be part of the confirmation process. "It's only clear that the Supreme Court affects lots of public policy," Herget said. "Certainly since the time of John Adams, presidents have always tried to place people on the court who share their judicial philosophy." Director of the Council of Ethnic Organizations Joel Richards, initially against the confirmation because of Thomas' views against affirmative action and abortion rights, said Bush's tendency to nominate conservatives justices had forced him to accept Thomas. "When I compare him to Thurgood Marshall, I see a lot of flaws," Richard said. "But, the Democrats are in a no-win situation. Bush will always nominate a conservative. "If it is a question of endorsing a white nominee with a conservative nature, or a black nominee with a conservative nature, I would choose the black because at least he knows what it's like to be black and has lived through it," Richards said. Cynthia Freeland, head of Women's Studies, said sexual harassment was a serious issue, but she feared Thomas' conservative tendencies were being ignored. "I do think people have been too side-tracked on the relevant issues," Freeland said. "I want to know his opinions on Roe vs. Wade. Issues like this have been sort of streamrolled, and he seemed to deny having opinions on them."- Anton Montano Scratch-off and Win First Texas lottery could start in July 1992 Houston voters joined those parts of the state on Nov. 6 in approving a state lottery by an overwhelming margin. With 98 percent of the precincts reporting, 70 percent of Harris County voters endorsed the lottery, while 30 percent voted against it. Across the state, 64 percent of the voters approved the money-making endeavor, and 37 percent voted it down. Robert Mayers, a junior engineering major, said he felt a lottery would help Houston's current financial situation. "As a whole, the city of Houston is in a major financial rut right now," Mayers said. "A lottery could generate the extra revenueweneedtogetback on our feet again." Kathy Winters, a sophomore business major, agrees with Mayers. "If we can raise enough money through a statewide lottery to help the deficit and the crime situa tion in Houston, why not give it a shot?" Winter said. One concern the students seem to have is where the money will go. Johnathan Hubbs, a freshman English major, feels it is important to find out exactly how the funds collected will be dispersed. "It's great that we can raise all this money and everything," Hubbs said. "Even so, what if the government decides to spend it in places where it is not really needed?" Funds will be distributed in the same each for each dollar collected. Of each dollar, 45 cents will go to prizes, 20 cents to lottery ad- ministration and 35 cents to the state's general revenue fund. Byputtingthemoney into a general revenue fund, the state is able to use the money onavariety of projects, as opposed to a more specific fund. Stores could be sell ing scratch-off lottery tickets by July.-Gayle Weiss