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Houstonian 1988
Greeks
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Houstonian 1988 - Greeks. 1988. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1988). Houstonian 1988 - Greeks. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19344

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1988 - Greeks, 1988, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1988
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1988, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Greeks
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1988_223.jpg
Transcript Hey pui>bJ Ia/AMA/A JOIN OUR FRAT ? An Educational Pledgeship Scavenger hunts and midnight calisthenics are out for Greeks: Educational Programs that stress know-how over show-how are now the rage. "Pledgeship has turned to education," Tau Kappa Epsilon member Clark Holzhauser said, "It's strictly educational, from books. It's a learning program more than an endurance program." A new and improved version of Texas' anti-haze law takes effect today, The new law makes participation in, or knowledge of, a hazing illegal, and it calls for university publication of the law, as in student handbooks. Penalties extend to $10,000 fine and/or two years in jail. Campus Activities Director William Munson said, student life policy bans hazing, as defined in the student handbook, and violators have been subject to disciplinary action from the Dean of Students Office. "Hazing has occurred or will occur in all organizations," Munson said, "and our goal is to provide information on what is hazing." "The traditional definition of hazing is fuzzy, anyway," he said. But the new law's definition is hardly fuzzy: An intentional or reckless act directed against a student that endangers his mental or physical health. The activity is usually performed by students who want to pledge, initiate into or maintain membership in an organization. The law bans physical brutality, physical activity, activities involving consumption of a food, liquid, drug, or alcohol, intimidating or humiliating activities and activities that cause a student to break a law. Assistant Dean of Students William King said two university organizations have been on probation for hazing in the last two years. At least 39 hazing deaths have occurred in the United States since 1978, seven in the last five years. Twenty-seven states have hazing laws, four of which were passed in the last year. Illinois passed the first law in 1901; it has since been updated. Texas first passed such a law in 1937. Efforts to strengthen it failed in 1985, but the 1986 hazing death of University of Texas freshman Mark Seeberger helped push the new law through the Texas Legislature in June. Seeberger died after being chained inside a van and driven around Austin, while being forced to drink with his free hand. His fraternity, Phi Kappa Psi, was suspended from the university for four years, and eight students were disciplined. Hazing is nothing new to Texans: — A former UT student, Lee Roever, settled a hazing lawsuit with his former fraternity, Alpha Tau Omega, last month. Roever almost lost a hand after the fraternity's "Help Week" in January 1986. Roever said he and his fellow pledges were locked in a room, pelted with 800 dozen eggs and deprived of sleep during the week. He developed a fever of 106 and a staph infection in his hand. He said he brought the lawsuit to help cover almost $25,000 in medical fees. The fraternity lost university privileges and its national charter for at least three years. Sen. Gonzalo Barrientos, the sponsor of the Texas Law, said he was first exposed to hazing while growing up in Bastrop, Texas. "It never failed. Once a year or once every other year, three or four naked students came knocking on our door, asking to use the telephone." — Texas A&M Corps Cadet Bruce Goodrich died of heat stroke in fall 1985 after being forced to perform "motivational exercises." Other pledge- related deaths have been reported at Lamar University, Baylor University and Texas Tech. Psychologists say hazing occurs because of a desire to fit in with a group. Rachel Lauer, director of Pace University's Thinking and Learning Center, counsels hazing offenders. "It's nothing more complicated than they did it the year before," she said. "The harder it is to fit into a group, the more people want to join." — Ruthie Piller Greeks 299