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Houstonian 1988
Residence Halls
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Residence Halls. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19321.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Residence Halls. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19321

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Residence Halls, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19321.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Residence Halls
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_200.jpg
Transcript Culture Shock I've always liked the Doors, even as a mere child. When I was twelve years old, I adopted "my" song, "People Are Strange." In a town of 10,000, it isn't that difficult to be different. I was darned proud of myself. I was different. Everybody said so. I hear college is a learning experience. I learned one thing right off the bat. I learned trie true meaning of the word "different." She was tall, but not uncommonly so. She was younger than I, but 17 isn't such an uncommon age to begin school. Her family was well- off. To read her biographical data, you really couldn't distinguish her from any of the other hordes of mildly spoiled kids. Except for one thing . . . she wore burlap bags with pride. No, I am not speaking figuratively of the middle-class guilty — the kids who become vegetarians but still buy leather goods. I'm not talking about someone who wears her Krugerand jewelry to sit- ins at the South African consulate. This girl was not hypocritical. When she dressed in sackcloth and ashes, she dressed in sackcloth and ashes. She worshipped Andy Warhol and David Bowie. I saw the Thin White Duke everywhere. (I realize they're only posters, but I just can't help thinking that that man knows exactly how often I shave.) Just because the most radical thing I've ever done in my life was to sing "Rock Island Line" with the windows rolled down, cruising through the suburbs of my hometown doesn't mean I should be scandalized when she gives hallucinogens to my hamster, does it? That doesn't mean that I should be shocked when she wants to be called Poly (for Polygamist), does it? Just because I shouldn't have been, doesn't mean I wasn't. When I walked into my dorm room, I was ready for the college experience. I knew I was playing Russian Roulette with my roomie, but I felt reasonably sure that everything would turn out all right. I mean, there aren't that many 300-pound lesbian lady wrestlers in the world — are there? I'm reasonably tolerant. I am a Democrat, but I've dated Republicans. I am studious, but not to the point of letting that interfere with my grades. Calm. Subdued. Middle of the road. Cashmere sweaters and sensible shoes. You get the idea. She, on the other hand, was wild and excessive. She was not only a wannabe, she was a betterthan. She would have made Madonna feel like a madonna. She was fond of spandex pants, shiny brassieres, and anti-social hairdos. But no shirts. I did try. And to give her credit, so did she. Lord knows, it probably wasn't easy for her to put up with my Rush albums when she would have much rather been listening to Bob Dylan's "Just Like a Woman" over and over and over and . . . Actually, we did get along for the first few weeks. We were buddies. We visited each other's homes. We went to the malls. I became more shocking. She became less socially acceptable. For every one step I made towards agreement, she took two away. She built a shanty, I went to Austin. I came home, walked into my dorm room, and found my possessions in a heap in the middle of the floor. She said she did it because I was "not responsive to her needs." She became diet-conscious. Then she became diet-obsessive. Then she became suicidal. When her depressions became really bad, I began leaving razor blades in conspicuous places and frequently mentioning the plethora of dangerous chemicals to be found in our room. Finally, it was over. She had her boyfriend move in. His nickname was Slug, and he liked it. He wasn't exactly tops on my list of folks with whom I would have chosen to live. (In fact, she didn't like him much either. In fact, if you wanted to get technical he didn't even like himself.) He had to tolerate this, she wanted to, but I didn't have to. I moved. Computers are wonderful things. They remind you to pay your bills, they lose all record of our grades at graduation, they make sure your rubber checks bounce just as soon as they are written, and they assigned my roommate to me. No wonder I'm a history major. Caesar didn't have to deal with these problems. — Elizabeth Hargis Although Midterm time is the most popular for room changes, it isn't at all unusual for switches to be made as late as May. 252 University of Houston North Towers — 15th Front: Michelle Larson. Back: Socorro Pedriza, Isabel Hernandez, Laura Dela Graza, Joyce Wang, Sherina Jones, Lark Jarvis. Front: Nick Karakulko, Ken Munn. Second: Jim St. Leger, George Conway, Mike Lovell, Deron Arnold, Frank Jones, Russell Holcombe, Russell McKean. Back: Tony Evans, Mario Varela, Ken Williams, Ade Sukadis, Detrick Hughes. North Towers — 16th Residence Halls 253