Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1988
Organizations
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Organizations. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Organizations. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19303

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Organizations, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Organizations
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_182.jpg
Transcript The Apple of Knowledge ~ While some people on campus are struggling to learn about electrodynamics and multivariable statistical methods, there are others that are struggling to read street signs. "I think it's tragically ironic that there are people across the street from a university who can't read or write," said Richard Braastad, founder of the UH Literacy Corps. "It is morally intolerable that an institution of higher learning has a problem with illiteracy." According to the Texas Education Agency, there are 500,000 functionally illiterate adults in Houston. These people cannot grasp English well enough to perform basic skills such as reading a street sign or a "According to the Texas Education Agency, there are 500,000 functionally illiterate adults in Houston. It was not until I rode the bus through the Third Ward that I saw the poor people surrounding the campus." bottle label. Some of these people live less than a mile from Agnes Arnold Hall, and some work right next door in the Physical Plant, said Braastad, an education graduate student. So he founded the Literacy Corps, a campus group organized last semester to recruit student volunteers to teach people how to read. Braastad, 26, said he became motivated to volunteer when he started attending school and was exposed to the poverty and illiteracy in the areas around the university. "I come from a white, upper-middle-class background," he said. "It was not until I came here and I rode the bus through the Third Ward that I saw the poor people surrounding campus." I thought, "This is crazy. Somebody's gotta do something about this." Braastad is now a member of the Houston-based volunteer organization Literacy Advance and teaches a 22- year-old man who lives across from the university how to read and write. Braastad spends one and a half hours a week at the man's home off Scott Street. "A lot of students say they don't have time to volunteer four hours a week to teach a maid or janitor how to read, but they should be able to THE NUTRITION CLUB — Front: President Carol Lapin, Adviser Beverly Gor. Second: Nora Cas- taneda, Shirley Boyd, Vice-president Elizabeth Hogan, Treasurer Mamie Robalais, Maria Seng, Rosemary Amoroso. Back: Sandy Kuehl. spare at least a couple hours to do volunteer work," he said. "I suggest they stop watching TV for a while and answer a phone for a couple of hours a month." Braastad said the Literacy Corps is patterned after a similar student volunteer organization at Rice University, where 25 percent of the student body is active in community volunteer work. He added that other colleges such as Houston Community College and Baylor University have programs that train university students to tutor illiterate people. Students at Louisiana's Tulane University have given lessons in reading and writing to university employees for the past 20 years, he said. The group's chief short- range goal, Braastad said, is to recruit students to tutor the 30 illiterate maids and janitors who have requested help to overcome their illiteracy. He added, however, that he ultimately wants the group to evolve into a bigger group that would get students involved in community work in the neighborhoods surrounding campus. "I walked across the street," he said, "and I'd like to get other students to walk across the street with me." — Georgeann Sheppard 218 University of Houston