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Houstonian 1988
Sports
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Houstonian 1988 - Sports. 1988. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 3, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19273.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1988). Houstonian 1988 - Sports. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19273

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1988 - Sports, 1988, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 3, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19273.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1988
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1988, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Sports
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1988_152.jpg
Transcript 2. A student service fee for Handicapped Services, Veterans' Services, Dean of Students, Learning Support, Career Planning and Placement, Counseling and Testing, Health Care Center, etc. 3. An athletic fee. The final analysis is that athletics got its money from student service fee money that was freed up by shifting money around from CTS, Career Planning and Placement, Handicapped and Veterans Services. The administrators took state funding from these services and used the money for athletics and salary increases for faculty, thus making the aforementioned services totally dependent on Student Service Fees and straining the Student Service Fee Budget. To replenish this money the administrators used SSFPAC to approve the $15 UC Fee, which would free up $800,000 to $900,000. — Jonathan Jereb A campus survey According to a survey conducted by the Student Service Fee Planning and Allocation Committee for their Budget Recommendations for fiscal Year 1989 to determine students' opinions regarding a University Center Fee: 1. A majority of students would prefer a designated fee structure (i.e. Health Center Fee, UC Fee, Athletic Fee, Student Activities Fee) as opposed to a general fee. 2. An overwhelming minority of students have said that they could not support a UC fee. 3. The top five programs in terms of importance for students on our campus are (starting with the most important): — Career Planning and Placement — Health Center — Handicapped Student Services — University Center — Campus Activities 4. The bottom five programs in terms of importance to students are (starting with the least important) — Athletics — Spirit Board — Dean of Campus Life — Council of Ethnic Organizations — Intramurals The committee, under the direction of committee member Lenny Cervantes, and with the help of the Assistant Vice-President for Student Affairs, Mark Bookman, concluded "the survey clearly shows that Dr. Van Horn's budget proposals are clearly out of step with needs of the students. And since the Student Service Fee is meant to provide services and programs to serve the needs of students, and not the needs of any one department, the committee has no alternative than to provide a budget which reflects those student needs." Gvns ovcr BoTreR JMHfot*^ \g%*#**""[ :% 9 -to hijrttR &aucatio*/| ^ foa A Good ^<*»e on -wv In a report presented to President Richard L. Van Horn, on April 8, 1988, the Student Service Fee Planning and Allocation Committee stated that its investigation revealed that the Department of Athletics was running an annual deficit of $4 million, and that the total subsidy to athletics over a 10 year period was in excess of $40 million. "Based on the financial information provided to the committee by the Athletic Department and the Budget Office," said the report, "it seems that the University has subsidized, through the fee and transfers, the (athletic) program to the tune of $4 million dollars per year. In a decade, that means more than a $40 million dollar subsidy. The committee does not believe that anyone can suggest that gifts and donations from athletic supporters come anywhere near to this figure. Our review also suggests that the real cost of the athletic program is far greater than that reflected in the budget. The budget fails to include the costs of field maintenance, lights, utilities, and other similar support costs." It was reported previously (The Houston Post, April 2), that for the fiscal year 1989, the Athletic Department requested an annual budget of $3.5 million. The Department said it can raise $1.5 million and wanted a $2 million Student Service Fee subsidy. The budget committee observed, however, that the Department had greatly overrated its fundraising ability, and that even a $300,000 figure would be too optimistic. Despite a misleading initial budget estimate, and the Athletic Department's failure to account for the accured $40 million deficit, the budget committee had nevertheless proposed a $1.6+ million Student Service Fee subsidy to athletics. The newly proposed budget figure had also uncovered some $800,000+ in the so-called "transfer," and a previously unreported departmental "revenue" of $4.2 million. The total budget for the Department of Athletics that the committee endorsed, oddly enough, was no less than $6.7 million, or $3.2 million higher than the initial request. The former football coach Bill Yeoman, who was forced to resign following one of the Athletic Department's public scandals three years ago, was then appointed a fundraiser at $103,000 a year. In three years that he's been on the job, he could not raise more than $30,000. The net drain on the budget just for ex-coach Yeoman — $279,000. It was reported that no more than 6 percent of the students actually attend athletic events. — Fabian Vaksman Sports 175