Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1988
Sports
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Sports. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19272.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Sports. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19272

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Sports, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19272.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Sports
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_151.jpg
Transcript Services Jeopardized Students can thank themselves that student services will not fall under the ax of the proposed budget recommendations. The bottom line is that nothing was cut. But, first students had to approve a referendum for a $15 per semester University Center Fee and administrators had to transfer money from different services. President Richard Van Horn has said the first priority has been and continues to be support for academic programs. The administration is committed to remaining a NCAA Division 1 School and has already cut the number of athletic teams to the minimum of 12. The monetary problems of the athletic department are due in part to lower enrollment rates, a drop in ticket sales, a drop in the amount of state funding for athletic programs and in television revenues. These problems continued to squeeze the athletics program. During an annual budget review, a committee member said that administrators decided to recommend removal of state funding for the Counseling and Testing Center (CTS) and Career Planning and Placement and to then shift the funding for these services to the student service fee. The state funds would then be used for faculty salary increases and development of academic programs. The committee member also said that there was no cut in any student service funding, so there was no cut in student services. Next year, the same level of student services would be maintained. The administration recommended using a larger portion of the student service fee to increase the subsidy to athletics. If implemented, these recommendations would have placed a strain on the student service fee. It appeared that handicapped and veterans services, CTS and Career Planning and Placement would be cut. However, the proposals eventually were averted. To protest the proposed budget cuts, veteran and handicapped students staged vigils outside of the president's office. The president's proposals received negative media attention and the administrators requested student leaders to help by making recommendations on Student Service Fee (SSF) allocations, thus SSFPAC (Student Service Fee Planning and Allocation Committee) was called on. The SSFPAC report states that all funded units were concerned that a negative reaction might occur, such as retaining current students and recruiting future students. The committee then formed two subcommittees. The first subcommittee explored alternative solutions to the pressing budget problems without negatively impacting student services. The second subcommittee conducted a survey of student opinion in regards to a University Center Fee and reviewed various methods with which such a fee could be implemented. SSFPAC then conducted a public meeting that drew more than 300 students, faculty and staff with questions about the recommendations of SSF allocations. The final step in the process was the development of a Student Service Fee budget, making no assumptions about a possible University Center fee. That budget was based on the findings of the two subcommittees, the results of the survey, feedback from students, faculty and staff, careful examination of programs, budgets and the president's plan and the personal feelings of the committee members. The committee then proposed a referendum on a $15 per student per semester University Center Fee which was approved in April, and will be instituted in the fall 1988. This frees up $800,000 to $900,000 of student service fee money that was originally to be used for the UC but now will be used for services such as CTS, Career Planning and Placement, Handicapped and Veterans Services. The SSFPAC report states that currently, the University of Houston's UC is recognized as the largest facility of its kind in the state and UH is the only senior, public university that does not charge a separate student center fee. Those fees range from $36 a semester at UT Arlington to $5 a semester at Stephen F. Austin. UH-Downtown has a $25 a semester student center fee. President Van Horn agreed to a number of concessions if the referendum was approved, among them: — No more than $1.89 million of student service fees will be designated for any one SSF funded unit for 1988-89 and no more than 35 percent of the fees generated for the next four years will be dedicated to any one funded unit, e.g. athletics. — A primarily student committee will be established to make recommendations on the allocation of all money raised through the University Center Fee. — The first $850,000 in funds generated through the UC fee in 1988-89 will go to operations of the University Center and Satellite, with any excess funds put in reserve for repairs and renovations of the two facilities. The SSFPAC report says the committee intends to develop a student fee plan to be submitted for adoption by the president and the Board of Regents. Such a plan would look at all mandatory fees applied to most or all students, but not tuition, compare UH to other Texas public universities and the Urban 13, which nationally are the 13 major public universities in metropolitan cities, and examine not only what the fees are but how they are administered and spent, and look toward developing more specifically to the purpose of each fee, with the hope that this could reduce the annual debate on what is appropriate. A possible model might be: 1. A student activities fee for student government, student programming, in- tramurals and student publications. "I think their (the students) voice is well heard, but I don't hear an alternate solution" — V.P. Paul Moore. Photo by Mark Lacy. "I came here to get a good education, not to wfl^ a bunch of morons bang heads on a football field — Dan Lilly, Drama Student. Photo by Mark Lacy. 174 University of Houston