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Houstonian 1988
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Sports. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Sports. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19239

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Sports, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Sports
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_118.jpg
Transcript 'Formidable Squad' Surpasses Expectations ever for UH, with 23 points (on 10-of-15 shooting) and 16 rebounds. And the Cougars outrebounded the more physical Rebels, 42- 37. But 39 percent shooting led to the loss, 89-69, the worst UH defeat of the decade. Houston traveled to Minneapolis to face the Minnesota Gophers in their next game. But the team seemed to forget how to make baskets; their shooting percentage of 33 percent was the worst of the year. Of the nine men who played, only Richard Hollis made at least half of his shots. Not surprisingly, the Gophers coasted to a 65-50 win. But a trip back to Foster's old stomping grounds settled things for UH quickly. Playing in Lamar University's Spindletop Blowout, the Cougars first scrappled past Drexel, 91-88, led by Hollis' 37 points and Ferreira's 23. Then the unlikeliest of heroes led the Cougars to the tournament championship over host Lamar. Tom Grant had two big moments in the spotlight this year — one in the opener against Sam Houston when he scored 21 and the other against the Cardinals. Grant's 19 led four Cougars in double figures as UH skidded past, 71-67, raising their record to 5-2. The Lamar tournament was important for several reasons. Grant's performance in the Lamar game allowed Hollis to shift to small forward, a position much better suited to his formidable penetrating and rebounding talent. And it also showed that Houston played better with a different person playing shooting guard, if only to allow Hollis to shift down with Ferreira and freshman Craig Upchurch. That's where the other revelation of the Lamar tournament came in, Horace Chaney didn't make the list of eluding scorers in the two games, so a key stat was overlooked by many. Chaney scored 11 and 13 in the games (his first double figure games of the year), but more importantly, hit three three-pointers in each, showing the ability to hit the needed outside shot. While Grant also made a minor run for the position — with his Lamar game and 16 points and 15 rebounds in the next game against Texas — Tom was a regular occupant of Foster's doghouse since the coach first arrived from Beaumont. But before Foster could tinker with putting Chaney with the starting five, Randy Brown, Houston's point guard, quit the team and returned to his Chicago home. Rumors abounded; one newspaper speculated that Brown was considering transferring to DePaul or Chicago State, both schools closer to home. The reason for Brown's departure, he explained after returning a week later, was that "I needed time to think and get my head straight." Some of the problems worth pon dering included UH's recruitment of Derrick Daniels and Eddie Cumbo, two guards with strong point guard abilities who could challenge Brown's lock on the job. Daniels, in particular, had been quoted that he expected to be starting for the Cougars next year. The timing of Brown's leaving was troublesome; it was only two days before UH was to travel to Austin for the Southwest Conference opener against Texas. Foster moved Chaney to point guard and he responded with 16 points, but only two assists. Houston dropped the game, 65-63. Things didn't get much better against New Orleans in another road game, UH's fifth in a row. Chaney again hit double figures, as did Hollis and Ferreira, but also got only two assists again. In each of Chaney's games at point guard, Houston as a team had season lows in assists with nine. Brown was back, though, for the game against Texas Tech at Hofheinz. This was Craig Upchurch's chance to debut as star. The freshman from St. Louis was a last- minute signee for Foster, but he was still expected to be a key contributor at power forward. His rebounds had regularly been there, but Upchurch was in a deep slump by the time the Raiders hit Houston. Tech, though, seemed happy to send Upchurch to the free throw line. Craig hit 10 of his 15 free throws along the way to an 18-point, nine- rebound performance. UH won, 72-67. One week later, he hit all eight of his shots from the floor and led the Cougars to a 77-57 thrashing of TCU. But in the next four UH games, the meat of the SWC schedule, the Cougars picked up only one other win. When the first half of the conference schedule finished, Houston was 4-4. Then came Louisville and Virginia. The second half of the SWC slate saw few of the early-season stuttering problems. UH lost only to SMU and Baylor, who would finish 1-2 at season's end, as the Cougars had a second-half record of 6-2, cementing the fifth seed in the conference tournament. UH blasted Texas in the first round of the tourney, 72-57, locking the shackles around soon-to-be-fired Horn coach Bob Weltlich. But against SMU in the semifinals, Houston never had a chance. SMU was simply unconscious, throwing in shots from all ranges and all types, while the Cougars could only watch and shake their heads. The Mustangs shot better than 61 percent for the game and devastated Houston, 98-76. But UH's 17-12 record kept them alive. Although they had too many losses for con- Men's basketball team coaches, trainers, and managers. Photo by B. Ashley. sideration for the NCAA tournament, the prestige of the program — and the potential scoring explosiveness shown in that TV game against Louisville — earned a bid to the National Invitation Tournament. The bid continued Foster's record of reaching a postseason tournament in each of the seven years that he has coached. The first-round NIT game was at Hofheinz, against the Fordham Rams. Although a vicious rainstorm kept many people away, the Cougars played their steadiest game of the year. The deliberate Rams tried several times to shake Houston's up-tempo inclinations. But Houston did what was necessary; playing strong defense over most of the 45-second clock; then coming down quickly to run the offense. Brown was the biggest beneficiary of the slowed play. Since there were few fast- breaks. Brown got an unusually high number of assists. In fact, his 15 set a NIT record for one game as UH cruised to the 69-61 win. The NIT pairing committee then sent the Cougars to Fort Collins, Colo, to face Colorado State. CSU was paced by Texan Pat Durham at center, and Durham and Ferreira squared off in what was UH's best battle of the season at center. Durham scored 25 points while Ferreira tossed in 21. The final outcome for the game was similar: CSU finished the Cougars' season, 71-61. Chaney and Upchurch helped back up Rolando with 15 points and 11, respectively. All of Chaney's scores came on three-point buckets. Houston finished 18-13, marking the second straight year that UH had reached 18 wins. Individual leaders in season-long stats included Hollis leading the team in scoring, three-point goals and minutes, and second in rebounds, assists, steals and blocks. In his last season at UH, Ferreira averaged 14.3 points and 608 rebounds. Before the opponent even realizes the ball is gone "00" steals it and is half-way down the court. Photo by John Schmalz. 130 University of Houston