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Houstonian 1988
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19182

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_061.jpg
Transcript DRUGS: some say we NEVER STOOD A CHANCE Night approaches and activity in the small community heightens. My eyes dart about, trying to keep up with all the unusual things to see. Rows of broken down homes stand feebly in a line, and t parents and young grandparents hang out of broken windows, laughing over the children's boisterous behavior. The houses look like patched-up shacks, with loose boards and foundations leaning to one side. The cheaply made cubicles are squeezed together tightly with no room left for a fence. The area smells of poverty, and even the street sign with its faded letters and bent post sways hopelessly. There are no sidewalks, and cars are parked haphaz- "HPD can't do shit — They won't stop it ever. Half the world does drugs," reports Jimmy, a 124- pound crack addict and dealer, in the Houston Chronicle (June 12, 1988). He's right. The city's police department is fighting a losing battle against drug use. As one crack house is destroyed, two are there to replace it. City officials continue to echo Nancy Reagan's campaign, "Just Say No." The Narcotic's Department continues to bust dealers and users as city neighborhoods continue to bar their windows and lock their doors to the increasing violence due to the increase of drug traffic. This year in Houston there were drug-related arrests and drug-related deaths. The number continues to grow and the enforcement agencies throw up their hands in disgust. The following is an account of life here on city streets, where drugs are ever present. Between poverty and despair the Fourth Ward leads to a path of desperation. Photos by Mark Lacy. 66 University of Houston ardly in the street or in man-made driveways. Barefoot toddlers, who should be in bed, run up and down the street in dirty diapers as young mothers forsake them for the brief attention of a friendly male. The night deepens, and one faintly lit streetlight casts flickering rays of brightness. A group of young men establish themselves on the curb and begin taking swallows of liquor. Others sit contentedly on their porches, playing dominos and slapping down winning spades. Money passes to the winners, while wails of anguish come from the losers. Women stand at the front of the washateria, talking of the latest news, "Honey he ain't no good ... don't you know he ain't come round he'er since!" Laughter rolls from their bellies which hang out of short skirts and old worn blue jeans. Toddlers continue to amuse themselves in puddles of muddy water left over from yesterday's rain. A long, old, Cadillac backs slowly out of a driveway and the driver begins to scream obscenities at the youngsters crouched in potholes in the middle of his path. "Get yo' knappy heads outta the street ... I'm o run ya ova!" The car speeds up maliciously and the children waddle away, laughing and squealing, "Skillet head, potat head, stu'id head." Adolescent boys stand on the corner teasing each other about their visible flaws, "Mayn, you' so ugly, the docta slapped yo Maama when you was bon." Raucous laughter rings through the night as the offended one scowls with angry shame. The young boys animate their speech with aggressive gestures, and each body contorts convulsively with every outburst. The boys begin laughing harder, as their need for humor overcomes the need for compassion. Girls of the same age, who look as if they've discovered the secret, stand on the same corner throwing their bodies vigorously to music that pounds out of a parked car. The steady bass that beats out seems to sedate, sooth, and suppress the frustrations kept in the bottom of their soul. They sing loudly trying to capture the boys' attention. As if, for the first time, the boys fix their gaze on the girls, and howl precociously, "Ooooooh, sweet thang, be my freak," "Go on and do that ..." They laugh at their attempts to woo the girls, but immediately become distracted by a foreign, unfamiliar, shiny new car, and elbow each other trying to reach the car first. The fastest boy emerges at the front and approaches the car window. The driver of the fancy car thrusts him a ten dollar bill, and the boy hands over a small glass vial. He walks back to the pack of boys, grabs a cackling girl, and walks towards the neighborhood bar. The new model car drives to the end of the street, and turns out of sight. — Juliette Farley frym,*/$! B$flf*< Drugs 67