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Houstonian 1988
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Houstonian 1988 - Issues. 1988. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19174.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1988). Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19174

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1988 - Issues, 1988, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19174.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1988
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1988, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1988_053.jpg
Transcript Mind-Benders Espouse Their Doctrine Every public speaker aims to either fool or educate his audience. If someone is formally committed to a particular viewpoint, his statements ought to be examined with a grain of salt. If he is not on solid intellectual ground, if he has something truly fundamental to hide, he'll try to control himself, and not allow "the cat out of the bag." A Webster dictionary defines a demagogue as someone pretending to be "a leader who makes use of popular prejudices and false claims and promises in order to gain power." It is strictly up to the listener to detect contradictions and inconsistencies however, and to protect his mind from being taken advantage of. And it's thus of fundamental importance for an individual to develop a trained intelligence and informed criteria for detecting a demagogue's smokescreen and lack of substance, as well as a skill to learn to ask the right questions to uncover the truth. The main difference between a speaker and a demagogue, as the Webster definition explains, is the ultimate goal. The goal of a bona fide speaker is to educate his audience, to relate a unique experience or knowledge acquired over the years of hard serious work. The speaker's ultimate goal is to arouse interest in his subjects of inquiry, and he can do so only by furnishing specific information of value to his audience, that is not commonly known. A bona fide speaker, above all, appeals to his listeners' intellect. He offers insights based on solid, objective, demonstrable evidence he is able to cite support of his views. His goal is not to induce an action, but to make the public informed, it will, of necessity, to follow the proper course. Its reason will be the force that becomes the motive. The demagogue, on the other hand, appeals to people's emotions. He makes them feel aroused or guilty, and tries to induce them to act irrationally. A person's reason is a protector of his well-being, it is a tool by which he identifies his proper interests. A demagogue is rated by single criteria — by his ability to arouse people emotionally and cripple their ability to think clearly. Emotional excitation, particularly of fear, is the only photo by Richard Schmidt Photo by Richard Schmidt. way a person can be induced to accept demagogue's assertions on faith, without a check of his premises, and start acting irrationally, contrary to his best interests and against the better judgement that his reason dictates. There are two major types of a standard contemporary demagogue: "religious" and "social." The goal of a "social" demagogue is to arouse a herd instinct, to induce his audience to jump on the band wagon, to make them "perform" as a group, one after another. He aims to arouse a peer pressure that propels a person to perform acts that are ridiculous or unnecessary, but can be dangerously self- alleged benefit or destructive, for the "entertainment" of the group. A "religious" demagogue, on the other hand, assumes that his audience feels guilty and seeks forgiveness for no apparent reason and his aim is to make it feel more guilty, and, again, make it do something based on that guilt, usually self- destructive. The common side of the two is that neither can tell his audience anything that it does not already know, or has not heard many times over. The demagogue's trick is not in what he says, but how he can bring it to such level of excitation that it loses all sense of reality and self-control, and is "prepared" to follow a "leader" unconscious of the direction in which he leads. The demagogue's aim is to play on people's emotions, to capitalize on their ignorance, to exploit them for the purpose ot gaining power. He gets that power after he manages to gain control of his flock's emotions and can thus compel it to do things that are demonstrably stupid just because he has told them so. One way to expose a demagogue is to catch him off guard, when he inadvertently admits what it is that he is really after. — Fabian Vaksman 58 University of Houston