Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1988
Issues
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19167.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19167

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19167.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_046.jpg
Transcript Gates closed Immigration and Naturalization Service agents enter a Los Angeles elementary school, kidnap a young boy and later deport he and his grandmother back to the country of El Salvador. Imagine deporting a child and his grandmother back to a country torn apart by civil war. That is exactly what Simpson-Rodino can accomplish. The "major purpose" of the Simpson-Rodino is the "control of illegal immigration." In order to accomplish this feat, the budget of the INS was doubled to $1.6 billion. This is added on to the $266 million already budgeted for Operation Alliance, a 500-agent military-like border patrol. There are currently plans to increase the capacities oi detention centers for illegal aliens in Los Angeles, Chicago and here in Houston. The current cent, er in Los Angeles, the Mardi Gras Mo tel, is designated specifically for children. It remains virtually unnoticed in the neighborhood. Is this necessary in order to protect our borders? Exactly who are we keeping out? At what cost? Most irnmi nants arriving from Latin American Countries — El Salvador, Nicaragua, Panama — are escaping political chaos and violence. Immigrants from Mexico are crossing the border to find work unavailable in their own catastrophi- cally depressed economy. An economy that Americans ourselves have helped to create. Most of the immigrants find work for the Californian harvesters or do menial tasks that many Americans would not even consider viable employment. The U.S. has provided a refuge for many unwanted and down-trodden people throughout its history. Are we to tell this new influx of refugees that they are not permitted to find relief inside our borders? What has happened to "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to be free ...?" Do we simply say, "Sorry guys, we gave at the office. There's no more room in our country for you or your problems — we'll send more aid to the Contras to help you guys out, but stay on your own turf." We cannot stay ignorant of the fact that these people need someplace to go. We need to remember that we are the land of opportunity. — Lara Schultz Legalization 51