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Houstonian 1988
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19162

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_041.jpg
Transcript A March ... Would you let your picture be taken at a March for Les- bian and Gay Rights? Chances are your answer will relate to the risks associated with being labeled as a lesbian or gay, whether you are or not. The National Organization for Women-NOW, Inc., founded in 1966 to obtain equal rights for women, had moved by 1971 to the position that lesbian rights must also be fought for. Many of those who supported what was then a very radical position, saw it strictly in terms of its civil rights aspects, i.e. every woman may be threatened by being labeled a lesbian and thus every woman's rights as an individual are at risk. As NOW members studied and thought about the issue, it very soon became evident that lesbian rights were more than just a civil rights issue — lesbians, by relating to women, challenge the traditional idea that women must be primarily defined in relation to men. Historically, many women who defied the "rules," who did not marry at a "respectable" age, who maintained an independent lifestyle, were called lesbians and were ostracized accordingly. Heterosexual women and men in NOW came to see the lesbian rights issue as "their" issue too and not just an issue for lesbian members. And given NOW's mandate to eliminate discrimination based on sex, lesbian rights soon became lesbian and gay rights. So in 1987, six NOW members decided to attend a conference at George Washington University (GWU) on the legal rights of lesbian women and gay men and also to participate in the march the weekend following. On the "I had been called a lesbian often enough for my militant feminism that it didn9t matter, but I could remember times when it did." — Jo Ann Evansgardner plane to Washington, we talked about what it might mean to us in our individual lives, because one of the NOW members who attended the march was Michael Williams, the Cougar photographer. We were excited to be going, but more or less apprehensive. We knew we would probably appear in the Cougar. Speaking for myself, I had been called a lesbian often enough for my militant feminism that it didn't matter, but I could remember times in the past when it did. We all agreed that is was a risk we had to take — as long as people can be oppressed, members of organizations committed to fighting an oppression have to speak up. That is the meaning of being a feminist — an advocate — someone who at the very least, speaks up in support of the issues they believe in. We learned a lot at the seminar at GWU. Mostly, we learned how very much there is to do to secure equal rights for lesbian women and gay men. Beyond the obvious, it is impossible to legalize a loving partnership. If one partner is incapacitated, the other may be totally isolated from him (or her) by a society that does not recognize their right to commitment to each other, as in the current case with Dr. Karen Thompson and Sharon Kowalski. Same sex couples face major difficulties in securing fair rates in insurance, health insurance for partners, in inheritance matters, in immigration situations, and loans for major purchases. Also, there are legal hazards for lesbians' mother and child relationships, and in 24 states with archaic laws governing private consensual sexual activity among adults, fines and imprisonment are a nightmarish possibility. continued 46 University of Houston