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Houstonian 1988
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19157.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19157

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19157.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_036.jpg
Transcript With Miranda reading required at the time of arrest, suspects in criminal actions are now abridged of their right to all aspects of protection under the Constitution, said Rosenberg. Palmer noted the significance of the Sixth, in his opinion, lays in the designation of the right to trial by; that jury being of the accused peers. But it doesn't determine in what court the case shall be tried, that right is enumerated in the Seventh. SEVENTH AMENDMENT "In suits of common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States, then according to the rules of the common law." This, the Seventh Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America, is one of the least sighted of rights guaranteed to the people. In as much as most citizens recognize their right to a trial by "an impartial jury" (as stated in the Sixth Amendment) the Seventh Amendment reads rather vague. According to Palmer, "The Seventh is a liberty protecting device," and the monetary value it describes is no longer effective. While the monetary requirement for Federal lawsuits has gone from $20, mentioned by the amendment, to a $10,000 minimum today, the purpose of the article has little change. "The value of a jury trial is in favor of liberty and not justice, it preserves the right of the people to strike back at government," said Palmer. In the 18th century when this amendment was conceived, the authors of the Bill of Rights intentions dated back to the Zinger or trial. According to Palmer, a colonial governor had tried to circumvent common law jury by resorting to "equity." By not using juries, the governor could direct the outcome of the trial. The problem arose again, said Palmer, right before the American Revolution when people wanted to put British troops accused of wrongs on trial by jury. The problem here being that the jury was not interested in the facts, just who the person was. That is why a trial by jury became a protector of liberty and not justice as commonly believed. The protection of liberty of the individual from the state, according to Palmer, is the reason for this constitutional amendment. The conscience of the people, it was felt can better judge the circumstances, within the law's definition. Washington, D.C. has more homeless per capita than any other state. Photo by Mark Lacy. r Reagan Regime The greatest threat to civil liberties is the current presidential administration, stated Laughlin McDonald, in the keynote address of the 1988 TCLU Statewide Activists' Conference. "Beyond Reagan: Civil Liberties Challenges of the 1990s/' cosponsored by the Texas Civil Liberties Union — Houston Chapter was held at the Hilton College Building on January 30. Members participated in panel discussions and workshops to learn more about the challenges the organization will face In the next decade. The Supreme Court under the Reagan administration has broken a trend begun in the 1960s that has been pro-civil rights, according to McDonald director of the ALCU Southern Regional Office. Congress, on the other hand, has proven to be an ally to the organization. An example he used was rejection of Robert Bork to the high court. He stated that the Supreme Court's support of civil rights is fragile and that any more appointments by Reagan could tilt the Court to even more conservative leanings. The ACLU has learned valuable lessons from the 1980s that they plan to put to greater use in the next decade. The McDonald Administration changes and the upcoming 1990 census will play an important role in the continued success of the ACLU. The reapportion of federal and state districts following the 1990 census will change representation in over 20 states, Texas being one of them. The ACLU has already begun to establish committees to ensure that the gains they have made in this area will not be lost. 'We have accomplished a lot. We know how we did it. We know what works and that there are solutions. We must continue the fight," McDonald said. Following the opening speech was a panel discussion on "Shaping Public Opinion" with James Gibson, a political sci ence professor, and Jann Snell, associate editor of the Bryan Eagle. "We thought most of you left [ACLU members] when Nixon resigned, Reagan brought a lot of you pack I see," said Gibson. Gibson presented his findings of a recent survey which showed that in the abstract, 71% of the population gave allegiance to the basic concepts of free speech and assembly. Fifty percent of the population were against allowing unpopular political, minorities such as the American Nazi Party, freedom to express themselves. "Tolerance is difficult to acquire, it is cognitive and intellectual rather than emotional. Institutional actions and the government teach American people intolerance," said Gib son. "We simply keep our mouths shut about politics.'1 "We want people to think better of the Bill of Rights. The average person does not understand these rights and as a consequence their rights are violated every day," said Gara LaMarche, TCLU Executive Director. — Lara Schultz Constitution 41