Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1988
Issues
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19147.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19147

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1988 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19147.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1988_026.jpg
Transcript J ESS I Jessica — I was there too. What was it like to be there, you know with all those people trying to see her, what was it like? Well that question is always asked when someone finds out I was on the Jessica McClure scene. The answer is always the same, "Eh, it was just another story." Well that's what a good reporter is supposed to say — isn't it? The problem is it wasn't just another story. Unlike a violent West Bank uprising, or mass murder in a quiet neighborhood, this story generated a sort of new found hope in our fellow man. From the start of Jessica's plight people could tell it was going to be a different kind of story. Jessica wasn't the first person to be trapped down a well and probably won't be the last. No, it wasn't the fact she was in there. The events that took place above ground were what really made the news. Until 1984 Midland, TX had been a booming oil community, but as oil prices dropped so did the town's economy and spirit, or so many thought. On an early October morning, Midland and the world would see that spirit and more revived, and many lives would be forever changed. A thirteen-month-old child had fallen down an abandoned water well. Help was needed. It came from everywhere. No one knew how she had fallen in, or why the well was so accessible to her. For that matter no one knew very much. Not that questions weren't being asked, they were. The major concern of the moment was, "she is still alive so let's get her out of the well." At first, the seventeen-year-old mother was unavailable for comment. Later, police and relatives convinced "Sissy", as Jessica's mother was known, that it would be a good idea to explain why her daughter was in the well. Apparently the mother and the aunt had been running a small day care center in the aunt's home. That particular morning "Sissy" had been watching the children playing in the backyard. She left Jessica and two other girls playing in the backyard while she went to the bathroom. When she returned Jessica was nowhere to be found. Fire rescue units arrived almost as fast as the news people. Curious onlookers were not far behind. Within hours the once qui- et neighborhood was transformed into a major spectacle. Police from other West Texas towns volunteered equipment and manpower to control the crowds. The news wires began to sing all over the nation and the world that a baby had fallen into an abandoned well, and rescuers were trying to dig her out. At first the rush of newsmen to West Texas was attributed to a slow newsday. Then the real reason became apparent, neighbor, friend, countrymen, inhabitants of the planet earth had become linked to little Jessica's plight and offered to help. At first, people were just curious, then they became emotionally involved with the situation in the small town in West Texas. People didn't even complain when Wheel of Fortune was preempted two nights in a row for live updates from the scene. Initial attempts to save the life of 13-month-old Jessica McClure. Delving deeper for Jessica's rescue. 30 University of Houston