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Houstonian 1988
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Houstonian 1988 - Issues. 1988. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 24, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19137.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1988). Houstonian 1988 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19137

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1988 - Issues, 1988, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 24, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19438/show/19137.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1988
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1988
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1988, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1988_016.jpg
Transcript . . . Or How It Should Yusaf Ismal, formerly Cat Stevens, spoke of the faith of Islam that frees the people from their political masters. Stevens converted to Islam in 1977 and now lives as a devout Muslim with his wife and four children in London. He has been involved in religious education in London. He helped establish an Islamic primary school there and is involved in curriculum development for religious studies in state schools. "I'm very interested in education as a means of helping improve society," Yusuf said. Along with his religion, he looks to science for answers to life's questions. But life for him, Yusuf said, is his religion, not music. After converting from Christianity to Islam, Yusuf gave up music. His last concert was in 1979 for charity; he said he does not plan to return to music. He said that when he hears his old music today, "It either embarrasses me or it confirms that I've taken the right step." "Music doesn't change your life. What changes life is when a person tries to develop himself as a better human being." — Yusuf Islam formerly Cat Stevens Pat Schroeder, the first presidential hopeful came to campus, spoke on issues from political involvement today. Schroeder, a democrat from Colorado, told the press that she would not announce her candidacy until she concluded her tour of the U.S. to measure her support. She said the Reagan administration is "by, of and for the rich, rather than the people" and urged student to keep involved in political issues by organizing groups of like-minded individuals. She also stressed her commitment to education by touching on current issues at UH. "We can't forget the quality of education for our children, starting with day care, right on up . . ." Schroeder said. "You tell (politicians) you're not dropping out, you don't get discouraged and you tellem you're coming back and out organizing against them. Boy, you'll get their attention overnight." — Patricia Schroeder U.S. Representative (D-Colo.) MARCH 23, 1988 A love-hate relationship exists between journalist Alexander Cockburn and the corporate press he ruthlessly attacks. The same mainstream media he condemns continues to publish his syndicated column. The Wall Street Journal runs his column every third week, and he writes for publications of such divergent readership as The Nation, L.S. Weekly, American Film and House and Garden. "I'm the token left of the Wall Street Journal," Cockburn told the audience. "They want me to be crazy . . . defend child torture . . . The best response was when I attacked God . . . over 4900 letters." In 1963, after graduating with honors from Oxford University, he followed the footsteps of his father, Claud Cockburn, one of Britain's most famous left-wing reporters, into a journalism career. He spent time in London working on various democratically-managed publications and ten years later became a columnist for the Village Voice. He targeted his reader, "a hippie taxicab driver," and perfected his role as the smart ass snotty Brit. He writes that, contrary to popular belief and journalism school curricula journalism has nothing to do 20