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Houstonian 1993
Academics
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Houstonian 1993 - Academics. 1993. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19078.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1993). Houstonian 1993 - Academics. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19078

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1993 - Academics, 1993, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19078.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1993
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1993
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1993, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Academics
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1993_191.jpg
Transcript With new tecnnology, students could get their scores immediately. But even better yet, the University of Houston was only one of four schools in the nation to recieve the Computerized GRE Graduate school candidates could take the Graduate Record Exam on computers and got their scores immediately. But as was usual with new technology, it cost twice as much as the standard written test. UH was one of four schools in the nation that recently acquired four computers as part of an experimental testing program sponsored by the Educational Testing Service. Until the computerized version began, only the paper version of the GRE was administrated at UH. Four times a year, approximately 400 students took the written test. Students taking the standard version of the GRE had to wait up to eight weeks for their scores, said Gerald Osborne, director of Counseling and Testing. The logistics of organizing mass testing was ahassle, Osborne said. Students had to show up an hour ahead of time and identifications had to be checked by the more than 25 supervisors on duty. With the computers, students like the convenience of arranged times and knowing their scores immediately, Osborne said. "The stress of waiting for your scores for eight weeks is nonexistent with the computer version," he said. "You know immediately if you need to re-schedule, start studying for the next test or get on with your life." ETS did not allow an immediate printed document of scores yet because they wanted to verify them, Osborne said. It took about two weeks for a hard copy of the test results to arrive at appropriate departments. UH could administer up to 40 tests per week. Test were given twice a day, five days a week. Both the paper and the computer tests took three to four hours to complete. Appointments were suggested to ensure that a computer was free, said Osborne. The computer test cost $90, compared to the $45 for the paper version. "As more student participate, the cost will go down," Osborne said. "Eventually, it will be less than the paper version." Students could take the computer test only once a year while the paper test could be taken four times. Osborne said this difference was due to the fact that there is only one version of the computer test but four versions of the written test. The new facility was available to anyone, but only 140 student had taken advantage of the computer test at UH. "Most of the faculty don't know that we have this new computer option. People in admissions don't know, either," Osborne said. "It's a well-kept secret because we're not as good at communication as we are at testing. "When we first got the system, they (ETS) told us not to advertise. I don't' know why," said Stephanie Siewert, UH test information specialist. The worldwide testing organization conditionally loaned the computers to UH in October. "ETS made the best IBM PCs available to us free," Osborne said. "The agreement is that if we keep the computers and administer the test for three years and then ETS will let us keep the computers." The other schools experimenting with the testing computers are Arizona State University, Miami's Dade College and Norfolk State University in Virginia. Of these institutions, only ASU's program had been successful as UH's facility. According to Walter Reeves, ASU test administrator, about 150 students had take the GRE on their computers. Reeves said ASU used their college and local newspaper as well as informational flyers to get the word out. Students at Norfolk State University complained of eye strain from looking at the black and white screen, said Robert Alford, Norfolk's director of testing. "They also have complained that they can't see the entire page of text," Alford said. "They have to scroll down to read it since only about three fourths of the page is visible." Siewart said, "The one downside is the math part of the test. Before they take the test they think it'll be difficult on the computer. They can use scratch paper though, so in the end it isn't really a problem. English, Spanish, Chinese and math placement tests were available. -David Sikes 322 Academics