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Houstonian 1993
Academics
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Academics. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Academics. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19067

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1993 - Academics, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1993
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Academics
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1993_180.jpg
Transcript The Fourteenth College It was official. At exactly 4:34 p.m., the Texas Higher Education Coor- was designed to supplement any discipline a student may choose. One would graduate with membership in the Honors College by completing the college's class requirements, which were 36 hours of honors classes in specific areas. If a student chose to complete a Senior Honors Thesis or take two graduate-level courses, he or she would graduate with university honors and honors in major field. The Honors Program was founded in 1959. "It is one of the oldest and biggest in the nation and most comprehensive in its mission" because of its dorms, scholarships, teaching faculty and extracurricular activities," Monroe said. The talk of changing the Honors Program to the Honors College began about 10 years ago, with serious deliberation beginning in the fall of 1988. "There was a widespread sense of cooperation in support of honors education, and there were not many obstacles," Estess said. "The question was whether the university would be better-served by an Honors College-we thought it would be." "I thing the college gives a lot more credibility to honors. It will create a lot of recognition for the university as a while, even though it is only a small part of it. It will also help draw attention and top scholars from around the United States," said Ed Noack, president of the Student Foundation and a member of the Honors College. In 1985, there were approximately 3 75 students in the Honors Program. It has more than 1100 students and 250 National Merit Scholars on campus. "The name change is more an acknowledgment of thechangesandimprovements made in the last five to seven years,'' not a prelude of changes to come, Monroe said. "Now, over 10 percent of the entering freshman class is in the Honors Program." Theuniversitywanted tobeassuredtherewouldbeno newfundsneeded. Thechange was made without the infusion of new money; it would be financed using existing funds, Estess said. "There is little change financially," he said. Estess added that he hoped the change would attract more alumni and donor funds. "It is an announcement of the university commitment to Honors." There were no imme- diateplanstorelocate,although conversationswere underway, Estess said. Expanding the library or renovating Oberholtzer Hall was a possibility. The Honors College had eight tenured faculty. Each held joint appointments with another departments. SenecaBrashear, a junior business major and member of the Honors College, believed the new name would attract quality professors. "As an Honors College, we will be able to maintain high quality, tenured faculty," Brashear added. "Having the Honors Program begin names the Honors College can only enhance recruitment of quality faculty," Monroe said. The change was expected to make the college and the university more attractive to prospective students. -Karla Lee dinating Board gave the final approval: The Honors Program was now the Honors College. HonorsProgramDirec- tor Ted Estess became Dean Estess and Associate Director William Monroe was an associate dean. Other immediate changes were more symbolic, but "don't underestimate symbolic changes," Estess said. Estess'membershipin the Dean's Council would "facilitate my being an advocate for high-quality, undergraduate education, honors in particular," he said, "and it also puts me in a better position to serve specific educational needs of undergrads." The Honors College differed from all the other colleges on campus because it was notadegree-grantingcollege. It Honors College students relax in the lounge area between classes or while playing a quick game of chess. The Honors College was located in the basement of M.D. Anderson Library. Photo by Gary Sapone. *<$K. Ted Estess Dean-HonorsCollege HONORS COLLEGE 306 Academics Colleges 307