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Houstonian 1993
Organizations
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Organizations. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19009.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Organizations. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19009

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1993 - Organizations, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/19009.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1993
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Organizations
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1993_122.jpg
Transcript % sent by God to deliver his message just like Moses, Christ or Mohammed. The faith taught the oneness of God and that there was only one race— the human race. It also espouses equality for men and women and the elimination of prejudice. "It's unfortunate that many people have the idea that religion is more like a cult. They fear it because many things are man-made, and most people don't investigate religions because of preconceived ideas," said Patricia Gonzales, treasurer of the Baha'i Club. At UH, the Baha'i Club had 14 members from at least five countries: India, China, Peru, Iran and the United States. The club had been on campus for at least 10 years, Gonzales said. Baha'i had more than 6 million followers of all races in every country, said Gonzales. In Iran, however, followers were persecuted, she said. The religion was based in Hiafa, Israel. Baha'i was not a traditional religion, in the sense that it neither had a clergy or a ritual, Gonzales said. The teachings were meant to awaken the spiritually dead and to awaken the soul, she said. Baha'i members welcomed everyone to investigate their teachings. "I would like them to know that the faith is here (at UH)," Gonzales said. -David Sikes BAHA'I CLUB. Photo by Noel Stone Bilingual /Baha'i 199