Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1993
Sports
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Sports. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18990.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Sports. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18990

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1993 - Sports, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18990.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1993
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Sports
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1993_103.jpg
Transcript Issues Student-A theletes i Are they given an educational opportunity or the shaft? 170 T|] 0 a I hey don't care about our education, as long as you're eligible," Lawrence Mouton, UH football player. The debate raged. Did athletes come to the school to play ball, or to get an education? Were schools really trying to graduate these student-athletes? Did the athletes care to get an education? It was hard to say. As allegations about alleged impropriety in John Jen- kins' football program came up, many players complained that they weren't getting a fair shake. Jenkins was accused of making practices too long, hav- ingunreasonable meetings. "You don't have time to study," said Jeff Tait, one of the first whistle- blowers. Athletics provided a study hall, in which attendance was mandatory for freshman, junior college transfers and players on academic probation. Tait said, "Study hall doesn't help, You can't force somebody to study. Putting players in a room with a bunch of guys they see all day long just doesn't work." Some players also claimed that the Athletics Academic AdvisingDepartmenttold them to take it easy to ensure their eligibility. A unidentified former player said a number of players who had used up their live-year scholarships were scrambling to get their degrees because they didn't take the courses they should have. "As far as looking out for students, they can't care less." Athletics Academic Co ordinator Michelle Matticks said, "We don't tell them to take easy courses. They must follow the degree plan for their major, so we recommended thosecourses,but we just council them, they fill out their own registration form." "It's atrocious to think that we are at a 20 percent graduation rate," said new athletic director, Bill Carr, who inherited the problem from former AD RudyDavalos. "I'm embarrassed, humiliated to think that they are that low. It won't stay that way." The data came from a study of athletes who began college in 1986. Out of all those student-athletes, only 20 percent graduated in six years. It was the lowest graduation rate in the SWCbutitdidcountagainstUH for those who graduated at another school. "It also doesn't include students like Andre Ware, who haven't graduated in six years, but are still working toward their degree," said Matticks. Women's sports at the university had better graduation records than do men's. Part of this was attributed to the lack of women's professional opportunities, but also because of the women's coaches commitment to getting their athletes a degree. The university didn't have the greatest rates for graduation either, out of all UH students, only 31 percent get a degree in six years. Bill Carr said that shouldn't be an excuse. 1 'What you have here is a commuter campus, with many different types of people attending, but our athletes are more reflective of a traditional college student," said Carr. "There's the traditional age, and they are all on campus. What di d it take to change the graduation rates? First, a commitment to improving the academic performance of the department through stricter study hall rules and hiring coaches and staff who would be dedicated to the athletes and not just the team's win-loss record. Second, stress and keep stressing that an education was what the college was here for, and that graduation was a fulfillment of the student's education. Third, find a better athlete. "We have to bring here student-athletes who are capable of graduating," said Carr. "They may be in a position where they need some structure and assistance, we'll be happyto help them in that regard, but if they come in here with a bad attitude, I can't use them." "I don't care how good an athlete they are, over time they are going to hurt us," said Carr. "It will take time, but we will have to be more selective in our recruiting." Part of the crack-down had already begun. New football coach Kim Helton had started "The Breakfast Club." If one of his players missed class or study hall, he would be expected to see the coach at 4 a. m. for a disciplinary run. Those who missed the run, would be dismissed from the team. UHwasn'ttheonlyschool having to work hard to get their priorities straight, and still trying to have successful teams. The lesson to be learned though, was that programs that made student-athlete-graduate were successful programs. -Michael Edwards Sports Student-Athletes 171