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Houstonian 1993
Sports
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Sports. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18989.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Sports. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18989

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1993 - Sports, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18989.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1993
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Sports
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1993_102.jpg
Transcript Somebody has to Pay, The ever-changing face of college athletics may have changed again after a lawsuit against the University of Texas was settled out of court in the Summer of 1993. Seven female students at UT filed the lawsuit, complaining that there were unequal opportunities for women. The hinging point was that there were more athletic scholarships for men (mostly due to large football teams). They also contended that women's sports were not getting a fair shake. A nation-wide argument ensued. How could the nation's 106 Division 1-A schools comply if the federal statute named Title IX was extended to dollar for dollar gender equity, rather than just the amount of men's sports teams to women's sports teams. Title IX was a statute that prohibited gender discrimination by educational institutions that received federal funds. UT agreed to add two new sports, women's soccer and softball to make a more equal number of men's and women's scholarship opportunities. The University of Houston had an equal number of men's to women's sports, but none of the women's teams had the same number of players as the near 150 member football team (more than half of those players were not on scholarship, but that they had the opportunity to be on scholarship seemed to be the point). "It will affect everybody in the country," said UH Athletic Director Bill Carr. "Right now about 32 percent of our athletic scholarships go to women, but we will probably have to add more women's sports." UH could not drop men's teams to compensate. The NCAA required competing Division I-A schools to have seven men's and seven women's sports, and that was exactly how many varsity sports UH had. Extra men's sports, such as tennis and swimming were cut during the economic and administrative turmoil in the 1980's. Football seemed to skew everything, though. Many schools would be equal without the football program, but football was the biggest revenue sport in the country, so most athletic directors cried foul when cutting back on football was mentioned. "If football is not given any sort of consideration as being a unique product of history, and it is absolutely dollar-for-dollar (equity), then football will be destroyed, and I am adamantly opposed to that," said Carr. "I want to see opportunities for athletes in other sports and for female student-athletes as well," said Carr. "But I don't want to see that happen by the destruction of football." Football had a larger-than-life quality that made it a commercial success, Carr said, and it was unlikely that any women's could have that same financial impact now, but that some, like volleyball and basketball, could be marketed so that they become revenue making sports, and not just funded by football. According to federal court rulings, just because economic reasons made it better to have a large football team, economic reasons were not a defense for discrimination. Football cut-backs may mean that the role of the walk-on or the redshirt may end in collegiate football. Another solution was to allow more scholarships in women's sports. While a school may only be allowed 16 women's basketball scholarships, that could be changed to accommodate 20. While UH and other schools weren't exactly closing their doors just yet, the significant changes from the UT and other lawsuits would change the way the collegiate game was played. -Michael Edwards 4Jf I V* \ X Br- Tv. kF Athletic Issues Women's track is the largest women's team at the university, yet it doesn't have as many members as the men's team has. Unfortunately, no scholarship figures were available at press time. Houstonian file photo, (center) 1 he women's swim team still exists under the coaching of Phil Hansel, but the men's team was disolved in 1983 to save costs. Photo by Thomas Nguyen, (lower left) t ootball may have everything to look sad about. Although it is the cash flow of most athletic programs, it takes more atheletes to field a team than any other sport. Most universities can't afford to add a large women's team to compensate. Photo by Thomas Nguyen, (lower center) 1 he little seen Tennis Team doesn't raise any revenue for the university. It is funded by profits from football, men's basketball and student service fees. Houstonian file photo, (below} i68mmmsports Gender EquityMl 69