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Houstonian 1993
Student Life
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Student Life. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18920.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1993 - Student Life. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18920

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1993 - Student Life, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/19121/show/18920.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1993
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Student Life
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1993_033.jpg
Transcript tudents couldn't escape these friendly 'applications. They attached themselves onto bulletin boards, hid between textbook and ffj j.j magazine pages, sneaked it SeemS like into mailboxes and lived the bottom of shopping bags at campus bookstores. Student credit cards, each with differ- j ent features, were of- Stll den tS are fered by a wide range of companies. The Trouble being encour aged to get About 70 percent of four-year college students had at least one credit card, said Myra Mills from the College Credit Corp. Credit card issuers targeted colleges because students tended With Plastic credit when they can t handle it" to keep their first card after graduation, she said. After graduation, people have higher-paying jobs and can afford to use their cards more, she said. It made sense for companies to try to get students customers, said Samantha Bousigues, a junior mathematics major. Most students can't afford to pay their bills on time, so companies could take advantage of late charges. The swarm of representatives and applications found on campus made students believe using a credit card was the adult thing to do, said Kristi Robson, a junior history major. Students were encouraged to sign up without being warned about future responsibilities, she added. Because representatives didn't always compare their card with competitors, it was hard for students to know what each card offers, said Leslie Coy, a senior accounting major. "If I had know the (interest) rates that different cards offer, I wouldn't have applied for my Visa, which I later discovered had a 19.8 percent rate," she said. Coy said she let herself get hooked into getting a Citibank Visa on campus because of the pushy salesperson and the ease of applying for the card. The only requirement was a student I.D., she said. The Classic MasterCard also had a 19.8 percent interest rate. Choice Visa charged a lower rate at 16.8 percent for purchases up to $1,300 and 13.8 percent for purchases over $1,300. Because Classic didn't require a co-signer and Choice does, students wanting one of these had to decide between a higher interest rate or having a cosigner. Most credit cards determined a credit limit based on a customer's income. "For students, the credit limit (set by Citibank) is usually between $500 and $1,000," said Ira White, a Citibank representative. Louie Troung, a sophomore MIS major, said because many students didn't have stable incomes, the information they first put on applications was not always a true estimate of their paying ability. "I guess we don't really think about it until it is too late," he said. Troung said he stopped using his only credit card because his debts gave him bad credit. "It seems like students are being encouraged to get credit when they can't handle it," said Jason McGaha, a senior computer science major. Besides interest rates, the annual fee was another payment students had to get use to, McGaha said. "I got a Discover card on campus because there is no annual fee," he said. Discover was the only credit card offered on campus that didn't require such a fee. Discover also offered students a 14.9 interest rate. Aracli Monsivaiz, a senior RTV major, said she obtained three major credit cards after seeing their applications on campus. Monsivaiz said although she has never been refused a card, she had been paying on her debt since she got her first card a little more than four years ago. -Karen Snelling All over campus, the major credit card companies are eagerly seeking to sign up students. Photo by Gary Sapone. 46%%%Student Life