Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1996
Random Access Memory
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1996 - Random Access Memory. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1996 - Random Access Memory. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15394

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1996 - Random Access Memory, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1996
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Random Access Memory
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1996_174.jpg
Transcript r r\ JSP ■ n n nn ■ ■p t « p AMI "^ f ^ n n n r UII III U u J L U U I U L B It is hard to believe that in today's society concentration camps, mass graves, ethnic cleansing and war can be such a quickly accepted part of our vocabulary and life. But, sadly, it is. A country that no longer exists, former Yugoslavia, was plagued by the consequences of the above terms. In America, we saw the pictures, we heard the word, but we never truly felt what the people of this country were feeling and experiencing. Professor Joseph Nogee is an expert in Eastern European affairs. When the media need an in-depth analysis of Russia or any other Eastern European country, Nogee gets a phone call. Nogee is a political science professor who came to UH in 1958 as a visiting professor. Now he is known for his knowledge of Eastern Europe. He has a book in the works, titled Politics of Russia. But even Nogee has difficulty understanding the events and reasoning behind the war in former Yugoslavia. "With the collapse of communism and death of Tito, the republics wanted to break away and become states. In 1991 Slovenija and Croatia broke away and were recognized. Then in 1992 Bosnia-Herzegovina broke * away. The problem was that Bosnia-Herzegovina had no majority. So, the Serbs started the war to carve out their own territory," he says. Nogee says that a major responsibility for the break up of former Yugoslavia is on the shoulders of Europe. "Europe had a lot to do with supporting the breakaway. Now the refugees are affecting Europe. I don't agree with what they did. The responsibility was dumped on the U.S., since no one else would take the responsibility." Religion was a major reason behind the war, Nogee says. The new countries can easily be defined by religion. While Croatia and Slovenija is predominantly Catholic, Serbia is Orthodox, and Bosnia-Herzegovina are mostly Muslim. "The Orthodox Serbs simply did not want to live under Muslim domination in Bosnia," Nogee says. The problem is rooted in the fact that Bosnia-Herzegovina did not have a "majority." The country had large groups of Serbs, Croats and Muslims. "With Bosnia, it was not a smart idea to have it divided. Bosnia should have been partitioned or should have remained a part of Yugoslavia, but with the assurance that the minority would be protected," Nogee says. However, the tragedy that Nogee swept over Bosnia-Herzegovina was not a solution to the break-away. Serbs overtook villages, bombed cities, killed thousands of innocent citizens and raped thousands of women, simply for land. "The Serbs have won one part of the war. They want more territory, but I don't believe that the Serbs would be willing to reignite the war," Nogee says. Why wouldn't they refuel the flames of war? Russia has been a known supporter of the Serbs; however, Russia no longer has the same security it once had. "Russia will have a new president. It could be someone who is not as cooperative as Yeltsin. The country is in a very weak situation and needs a lot of economic help. It would not risk alienating the U.S.," Nogee says. So the Serbs no longer have the support that they desired and could count on. If the Serbs were to reignite the war, Nogee says the solution would be in putting pressure on the Serbs, not arming the Muslims. "I feel it would be a serious mistake to arm the Muslims. Instead, we need to take measures to diminish armaments to all sides. We need to bring about Serb disarmament. It may be that the Muslims find it necessary to rearm, but it should not be the responsibility of the U.S." Nogee suggests that if the war were to reignite, economic and military pressures should be put on the Serbs. "We could cut off economic aid if fighting were to resume. We could put an embargo on the territory. We >• could resume air strikes, if ^ necessary. It all depends on w what the Serbs do. But we S have some advantages because J the war-time fatigue has set in. >> The whole war has been 2 inconclusive," Nogee says. The big question for Americans is, what is the future of our troops who are stationed across this land? "Clinton will take them out. He's politically compelled to withdraw the troops around October," Nogee assures. At last it seems that this civil war has slowly drawn its last breaths. Hundreds of thousands of lives were lost, children left without parents, parents left without children, families left without homes. Was the war worth it? The only ones who truly have a right to answer this question are now buried in the land that's been penetrated by the blood and tears they left behind. - Ivana Segvic o