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Houstonian 1996
Random Access Memory
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Houstonian 1996 - Random Access Memory. 1996. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 28, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15384.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996). Houstonian 1996 - Random Access Memory. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15384

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1996 - Random Access Memory, 1996, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 28, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15384.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1996
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1996
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1996, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Random Access Memory
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1996_164.jpg
Transcript The Waves of In the near future, we will communicate more often with more people. We will communicate in more ways, as communication technologies proliferate and become increasingly pervasive and powerful. Though we will become more frequent communicators, only a few will become more effective communicators. In the din, such efficacy will be at a premium as the presentation of information will become as critical as the information itself. Communicating effectively is not an innate ability, it is an acquired skill. The development of language did not make everyone a skilled orator. The printing press did not result in a glut of literary talent. Home movie cameras, inexpensive video camcorders, and public access cable stations have not flooded the airwaves with high-quality programming. Nor does the ease with which we are able to post information on the Internet make us the keeper of the "killer app." Communication skills need to be learned, practiced, critiqued, refined. Our School of Communication graduates have acquired these skills. They understand how communication works and they have learned to communicate Effectively, with force, clarity, conviction and passion. They have been given the foundation to excel as they enter a world increasingly reliant upon communication. Their acquired skills and abilities should take them far. —Dr. David Donnelly School of Communication