Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1996
Virtual Reality
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houstonian 1996 - Virtual Reality. 1996. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15257.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996). Houstonian 1996 - Virtual Reality. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15257

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1996 - Virtual Reality, 1996, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/15484/show/15257.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1996
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1996
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1996, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Virtual Reality
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1996_037.jpg
Transcript "Just say no," he laughed as he plunged his mouth into a two-foot glass bong, making an inverted pucker to suck in the water-filtered pot smoke. Jason*, a 20-year -old sophomore at the University of Houston, smokes pot every day. He has a 3.6 grade point average and good standing in the Honors College. "I go through about an ounce and a half a month," he said. His roommate, Greg* (3.1 GPA, good standing in the Honors College), used to go through about four pounds of pot per month, selling to traditional (ages 18-23) and non-traditional UH students. "Sometimes some of the older female buyers brought us cookies or something else to munch on," Greg said. Though UH is generally considered to have an atypical student population, Cougar students are part of a nationwide trend: increased tolerance to drug use. The most popular drugs among college students today are the legal ones: alcohol, caffeine and tobacco — and one not- so-legal one, marijuana. Harder drugs like cocaine, LSD (acid), ecstasy and mushrooms are also commonly experimented with by today's college students. The growing push for legalization of marijuana is supported by 34 percent of college freshmen, according to a '96 survey sponsored by the American Council on Education. That number is more than double the first count from '87. Indeed, getting high has not been this widespread since '79. According to a study by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 60 percent of high school seniors reported having tried marijuana. "Today's trends are similar to those of the late '60s," said James E. Burke, chairman of Partnership for a Drug Free America, in a recent USA Today article. Many studies have been conducted on the effects of smoking marijuana since the '60. Although no drug (legal or illegal) used in excess is healthy, alcohol and tobacco have been proven to be more harmful than marijuana. Ironically, the major financial backers for The Partnership for Drug-Free America are the pharmacutical, tobacco and alcohol industries. College students who grew up with Reagan-era slogans like "Just Say No" instead of accurate information are cynical about the fairness of the drug war. Students point to 80,000 killed per year in alcohol-related incidents and 390,000 deaths per year from tobacco smoke. Those figures do not include an approximate 50,000 deaths credited to second-hand smoke and 2,000 attributed to aspirin. That's more than half a million lives lost to legal, taxed drugs, compared to a grand total of zero lost from illegal marijuana use. There has never been a recorded death due to marijuana at any time in U.S. history. "That's a no-brainer. If you smoke too much pot, you pass out. You never hear of someone getting high and going home to beat up his wife, or abuse his kids," Greg said. Few people seem to realize how close marijuana came to being legalized during the Carter administration. In '77, President Carter recommended legalization to Congress, but the times just weren't ripe for that much changing. The Reagan era's "War on Drugs" platform imposed mandatory sentencing laws that more than tripled the number of incarcerated Americans in the next decade (to about 1.5 million), according to figures from the Department of Criminal Justice. Since '81, the United States has spent $150 billion tax dollars in the war on drugs, and projects another $150 billion spending spree by 1997. The cost to put a single drug dealer in jail is about $450,000: $150,000 of that is the cost for arrest and conviction; the cost of another prison bed is between $50,000 and $150,000, plus about $30,000 per year to house a prisoner — at an average sentence of five years, that's another $150,000. That's not counting opportunity cost to society for locking up human capital. Nineteen nighty-six is an election year, the debate on the decriminalization of marijuana and the legalization of all drugs continues. Conservative columnist William F. Buckley, Jr., watched marijuana and other drug use grow from a 1950's beat phenomenon into its current status as a drug for all classes. Buckley is one of the more public spokesmen for decriminalization of not only marijuana, but of all drugs. "We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 percent of the million Americans who are in jail today, occupies an estimated 50 percent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen — yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect," he said. Eleven U.S. states have passed legislation maintaining felony status for trafficking and distribution of marijuana but eliminates jail terms for people arrested for possession of small amounts of drugs used only for their own consumption. The annual Federal Government's Household Survey on Drug Abuse is the point of reference for statistics on drug use in America. This year's study showed that 12.7 million had used some illegal drugs in the past month. Ten million were presumed to be casual drug users, and about 2.7 million were considered drug addicts. (This survey was conducted by telephone). This year, marijuana will become America's largest cash crop, according to a USA Today article. When marijuana was outlawed by Congress in '37, the American Medical Association was opposed to the law. Prior to its illegal status, marijuana was an active ingredient in 40-50% of U.S. patented medicines. Its medicinal effects have been used by other countries, like China, for thousands of years. Today, more teen-agers are following the the footsteps laid by their Baby Boomer parents who consider smoking marijuana less offensive than other illegal drugs. To Jason, getting high is a spiritual outlet as important to him as Sunday morning church services are to fundamentalist Christians. "The government is willing to allow pot smoking only if it is part of an official religious ceremony, but to me, smoking pot fulfills a religious role, though I don't belong to any church," he said. If reason is to be regarded as a reasonable guiding principle in America today, the war on drugs must be reconsidered. That much is obvious. Abe Lincoln had a few words for opponents of marijuana legalization who recline on a lazy bed of rhetoric and hazily defined "values" while the tension mounts: "Prohibition ... goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a man's appetite by legislation and makes a crime out of things that are not crimes. A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded." According to the latest surveys by the DEA, there are some 40 million people who have pursued their happiness by using some illegal drug within the last year. That's approximately 12 percent of the population (sticking only to users within the last year) who have stated through their actions their dissent with current U.S. drug policy. If Bill Clinton and his Washington cohorts can inhale those numbers without coughing, perhaps finally the times will be a- changing. - Dominic Corva & Lisa Mahfouz ♦Names were changed to protect sources 47