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Houstonian 1934
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1934 - Cover. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/11221/show/11190.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1934 - Cover. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/11221/show/11190

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1934 - Cover, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/11221/show/11190.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1934
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Cover
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb1934004.jpg
Transcript DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENTS OE THE GENERAL COLLEGE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON The enactment creating the University °f Houston was officially adopted on April 30, 1934 by the ffoard of Education. With this enactment four of the reasons for the establishment of the University Were presented. They are: J To provide practical education for employed adults in co-operation with local bus<ness and industrial concerns. 2. T° Provide opportunity for a higher education for those who »re compelled to work after leaving high school. 5. To provyc opportunities for cultural advancement and £>eneral self-improvement desired by individuals Who are frequently barred from such opportunities by technical Prerequisites. 4. To provide higher education for high school graduates who for various reasons cannot leave home. Reginnirig with 1934 summer session, advanced, us well as freshr«an and sophomore courses are being offered. A Program of four years college work Will be continued jn the afternoon and evening college in the gan Jacinto building in the fall of 1934. However, to fulfill its functions more adequately, another branch of the University, to be known as '"fhe General College," will be established. This eol'eSe will provide the educational opportunities listed above as reasons three and four for the establishment of the University. The General College is being planned as a day college introducing to the pupils a new type of college currienlnm providing a comprehensive survey or overview of the activities and problems of mankind- It is being designed not as a school to transmit and advance knowledge alone but to utilize knowledge 0f facts- principles, laws and essential human attitudes related to the study and possible solution of problems of modern life. The courses will be developed to provide two years of college work of this broader type in place of the usqal fragmentary specialization courses. Specialization win be postponed almost to the last two Years 0f college. Courses in four major fields will indicate a comprehensive program for all students, allowing one elective, such as a specialized course in the held °f foreign languages or in the special field which the student wishes to choose later. The well-rounded curriculum of the General College niakes available for all students the background necessary for tne understanding of the problems of the Present tforld. This understanding is essential for intelligent citizens whether they choose to be doctors, lawyers, engineers, housewives, business men or te«ci,ers, of choose to engage in any of the other numerous vocations 0f life. This curriculum has also other advantages over the usual college curriculum composed of specialized courses. Whether a student stays one-half year or two years, his time will have been spent profitably in acquiring and using knowledge intrinsically worthwhile, even though his college education may be discontinued later. The two years General College work may be considered unit courses complete within themselves, since they provide a training not dependent on prerequisites nor on the completion of advanced courses later. First year chemistry, for example, as given in most college courses, may be of little value to the average citizen, the lawyer, business man, or other worker. Such a course is planned as the first course for the specialist in chemistry and is offered to every student at large. The same is true of many Present day college courses. The courses of the General College described here, however, are being developed not as a training field for specialists, but as a training field for intelligent citizens. THE FOUR GENERAL FIELDS OF STUDY The following brief scope of each of the four fields may give students and their parents an opportunity to judge the breadth and value of the program of the General College. For the sake of brevity this outline form is used: I. The Social Sciences In the field of economics: Wealth and natural resources, involving utilization and preservation of coal, oil, forests, minerals, economics, etc.; utilization of plant and animal life; institutions in modern business; problems of consumption and distribution, involving how goods are marketed, the place of the retailer, of profits, wages; attitudes toward advertising; department stores, chain stores, mail order companies; the consumer's point of view; the banks and bankers' place in the business system, involving interest, money and credits, discounts, kinds of banks, slate and federal supervision of banks, etc. In the field of history and government: The principles of popular government; individuals' responsibility in a democracy; world politics; government and business relations; tariffs; the labor problem: Political geography; problems of other races and nations; industrial and political revolutions; formation of public opinion, involving study of radio, newspapers, periodicals and books; a study of types of propaganda used in shaping public opinion for improving government, in securing special privileges, in selling campaigns, in political campaigns,