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Shop talks on economics
Image 52
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Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. Shop talks on economics - Image 52. 1911. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. (1911). Shop talks on economics - Image 52. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/875

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922, Shop talks on economics - Image 52, 1911, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Shop talks on economics
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922
Publisher Charles H. Kerr & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1911
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Economics
  • Socialism
  • Marxian economics
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 58, [6] pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.M3 1911
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304396~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 52
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3783716_051.jpg
Transcript 50 SHOP TALKS ON ECONOMICS would cease and prices would return to their former level and equilibrium. 11 The general rise in the rate of wages would, therefore, after a temporary disturbance of market prices, only result in a general fall in the rate of profit, without any permanent change in the prices of commodities. '' We will use a concrete illustration to explain Marx's point. In a mining camp the miners secured a gain of wages of from $2.00 to $3.00 a day. The man who ran the only restaurant in the camp thought he could raise the price of board from $4.00 to $5.00 a week. For a week or two the miners paid the advanced prices, but the third week a new restaurant was opened by a man who heard of the "prosperity" in this particular camp, and inside of two months there were four restaurants competing for trade in Golden Gulch. This competition among the restaurant keepers forced board down to $3.00 a week. Some of them moved away until board fell to the average rate of board in that state. As long as prices were better there new investors came to Golden Gulch, and when they fell below the average price for board investors went away. Marx says that when workmen and women get higher wages, they spend this increase in better food, better homes and better clothing. This stimulates the demand for food, clothing and houses. More capitalists begin to invest in food production, in houses and