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Shop talks on economics
Image 41
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Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. Shop talks on economics - Image 41. 1911. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/864.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. (1911). Shop talks on economics - Image 41. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/864

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922, Shop talks on economics - Image 41, 1911, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/864.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Shop talks on economics
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922
Publisher Charles H. Kerr & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1911
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Economics
  • Socialism
  • Marxian economics
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 58, [6] pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.M3 1911
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304396~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 41
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3783716_040.jpg
Transcript SHOP TALKS ON ECONOMICS 39 above its value for any length of time. To repeat: Reformer says: The wage worker receives his wages. That he is exploited by his employer. But when he goes to buy shoes, food, meat or clothes, he finds the owner of these commodities selling them at a higher price than he can pay. Then the reformers conclude that these merchants are exploiting the workers also. These people do not understand that the value of A (the necessities of life) determine wages. • Not all individual workingmen or women receive the value of their labor-power. Some men and women receive a little more than the value of labor-power. We know a young girl in this city who works in a department store for $5.00 a week. She cannot buy food, clothing and shelter for $5.00. Her brother receives $18.00 a week. He can live on less than that sum. He helps his sister pay her expenses. Thus both receive the value of their labor-power. Men cannot work long upon less wages than the value of their labor-power. They must have help from without. Fortunate members of families help those who do not earn enough to live on. Thousands of families receive intermittent aid from charity organizations, so that the working class, in general, receives just about the value of its labor-power. In other words, the army of workers receive enough to produce more workers for tomorrow and twenty years from now. It is the unemployed fighting for jobs who force wages down almost to the bare cost of living.