Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Shop talks on economics
Image 23
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. Shop talks on economics - Image 23. 1911. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/846.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. (1911). Shop talks on economics - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/846

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922, Shop talks on economics - Image 23, 1911, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/846.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Shop talks on economics
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922
Publisher Charles H. Kerr & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1911
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Economics
  • Socialism
  • Marxian economics
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 58, [6] pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.M3 1911
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304396~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3783716_022.jpg
Transcript SHOP TALKS ON ECONOMICS 21 Have you noticed that your gold (or money) exchanges for fewer commodities nowadays than it did ten years ago? Wheat is produced for a world market. Do you think wheat has decreased much in value in the past ten years as compared to the decrease in value (or social labor necessary) of steel? We believe it takes very nearly as much labor-power to produce a bushel of wheat (on the AVERAGE) as it did in 1900; hence its value must have remained nearly the same. Why then will a hundred bushels of wheat today exchange for MORE gold dollars than it did in 1900? If the VALUE of both commodities had remained the same and no monopolist controlled the world's wheat or gold supply, they would exchange upon the same basis as formerly. That is, the same amount of gold would exchange for (or buy) the same amount of wheat. Does the decreased value of GOLD result in the farmer getting a higher price (or more gold) in exchange for his wheat crop ? (Do not forget that, as Marx says, if we cannot explain profits upon the basis that all commodities exchange at their values, we cannot explain them at all.) Our next lesson will take up Surplus Value, which explains how capitalists make profits even though all commodities exchange at their values. Remember that we do not sell our labor. We sell our strength to work our laboring power, our labor power. Labor is the expenditure of labor-power. See Value, Price and Profit, pages 71, 72 and 73, When we apply for a job, we do not offer to sell our WORK, but our strength to WORK. # The commodities we make are crystallizations of our work or of our LABOR, but it is our strength to labor, or laboring power—our labor-power which we sell to the boss.