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Shop talks on economics
Image 22
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Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. Shop talks on economics - Image 22. 1911. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. (1911). Shop talks on economics - Image 22. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/845

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922, Shop talks on economics - Image 22, 1911, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Shop talks on economics
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922
Publisher Charles H. Kerr & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1911
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Economics
  • Socialism
  • Marxian economics
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 58, [6] pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.M3 1911
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304396~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3783716_021.jpg
Transcript 20 SHOP TALKS ON ECONOMICS their deviations from values, their ups and downs, paralyze and compensate each other; so that, apart from the effect of monopolies and some other modifications I must now pass by, all descriptions of commodities are, on the average, sold at their respective values or natural prices. . . . "If, speaking broadly, and embracing somewhat longer periods, all descriptions of commodities sell at their respective values, it is nonsense to suppose that profit, not in individual cases, but the constant and usual profits of different trades, spring from the prices of commodities, or selling them at a price over and above their value. . . . '{ To explain the general nature of profits, you must start from the theorem that, on an average, commodities are sold at their real values, and that profits are derived from selling them at their values, that is in proportion to the quantity of labor realized (or contained) in them. ■ ■ If you cannot explain profit upon this supposition, you cannot explain it at all." (From Value, Price and Profit, pages 68, 69 and 70.) QUESTIONS. Why does skilled labor-power sell (or exchange) at a higher price (for more gold) than unskilled labor? Does the fact that it requires more LABOR to produce a skilled laborer, that it takes more years of feeding, clothing and shelter to PREPARE a skilled workman, have anything to do with the VALUE of their labor-power? Mining experts tell us that it takes much less labor-power to produce the commodity—gold, than it did a few years ago.