Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Shop talks on economics
Image 15
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. Shop talks on economics - Image 15. 1911. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/838.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922. (1911). Shop talks on economics - Image 15. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/838

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922, Shop talks on economics - Image 15, 1911, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/892/show/838.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Shop talks on economics
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Marcy, Mary, 1877-1922
Publisher Charles H. Kerr & Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Chicago, Illinois
Date 1911
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Economics
  • Socialism
  • Marxian economics
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 58, [6] pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX86.M3 1911
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304396~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_3783716_014.jpg
Transcript SHOP TALKS ON ECONOMICS 13 V about one-half. If you have twenty dollars in gold it is only of half the value of twenty dollars twenty years ago. It contains only half the labor. In the same way we may determine the value of laboring-power. "Like every other commodity its value is determined by the quantity (or time) of labor necessary to produce it. "The laboring-power of a man exists only in his living individuality. A certain mass of necessaries must be consumed by a man to grow up and maintain his life. But the man, like the machine, will wear out, and must be replaced by another man. Besides the mass of necessaries required for his own maintenance, he wants another amount of necessaries to bring up a certain quota of children that are to replace him on the labor market and to perpetuate the race of laborers. ... It will be seen that the value of laboring-power is determined by the value of the necessaries required to produce, develop, maintain and perpetuate the laboring-power." (Value, Price and Profit, pp. 75-76.) The value of a man's labor-power is determined by the social labor necessary to produce it, Marx says. This means food, clothing, shelter (the necessities of life) and it means something additional to rear a boy or girl to take your place in the shop or factory when you grow too old to keep up the fierce pace set by the boss. Enough to live on and to raise workers to take our places—this is the value of our labor-power, if we are wage-workers.