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Revolutionary essays
Image 46
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Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 46. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 46. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/655

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 46, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 46
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_045.jpg
Transcript restoration of the bourgeois State as a whole, in contradistinction to the proletarian State. In such a case the restoration means the withdrawal of power from a class which can take part in the work of government only when it is in a position to become the sole master of that power, i.e., when it holds the dictatorship. A return from the dictatorship of the proletariat to the monarchy can only be a symptom of a form of reaction which, in the end, will, notwithstanding, shorten the path to Socialism. In future, Skoropadsky and the Duke of Mecklenburg- Schwerin can no longer be displaced by the Rodziankos, the Kerenskys, the Martovs : they can be displaced—and soon will—only by the dictatorship of the proletariat. Materials for the History of the Birth of the Hungarian Revolution. ("Pravda," July 24th, 1918.) The eyes of all workers are turned towards Russia. Mass emigations of the persecuted reach the Ukraine, but very rarely does anyone manage to reach Russia. Lately a Hungarian metalworker visited our group. He had deserted from the Italian front, lived in an illegal position near Budapest, and then fled, 00 June 1st, through Bukovina and the Ukraine, to Russia. His comrade had served in a prisoners-of-war camp, and had picked up a little Russian from the Russian prisoners. They succeeded in reaching the frontier by means of false documents, which are easily procurable in Hungary. One of them has communicated the following to the newspaper, "The Social Revolution"—the Magyar organ of the Russian Communist Party—concerning the reasons which prompted him to start for Russia— "I am asked why I left Hungary for Russia. I had my good reasons. "Instead; of the regime of Tisza, who was told to go to the devil in 1917, there appeared the far-famed 'democratic' government of Count Esterhazy. He displayed his zeal for democracy 'in practice.' He began negotiations with (44)