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Revolutionary essays
Image 43
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Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 43. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/652.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 43. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/652

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 43, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/652.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 43
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_042.jpg
Transcript to atoms by the workers themselves. All attempts at conciliation on the part of the leaders of the official Social- Democracy, whose aspirations have never left the bounds set by a narrow Parliamentarism, have beeen in vain. True enough, the proletarian movement arose elementally; the strikers have not a clear class feeling or a concrete social policy; the movement has no leaders, and is semi-conspira- tive; but it is undoubtedly revolutionary. Greater results have been achieved than by the last forty years' struggle for the franchise. In their search for the path to freedom, the workers have entered the trade unions. Before the war, the membership of the Hungarian trade unions never exceeded 110,000; during the last two years, they have had an increase of over 100,000 members. During the war it was impossible to transform the labour organisations in accordance with the revolutionary requirements of the proletariat; but the workers now are carrying on the struggle in spite of the trade union leaders. The mass struggle has in Hungary become the accepted method of the working-class movement, even though it has not yet received official sanction. For fifteen long years the official organs of the Party have threatened the bourgeoisie : "We shall begin to talk Russian." At the present moment, the Hungarian proletariat is talking and, actually, acting Russian. In Budapest there is a general strike. The railwaymen have struck. Other enterprises are on the eve. The postal and telegraph employees are adopting passive resistance, which is nothing but a veiled form of strike. The chief coal pits are also idle. According to the declaration of the Hungarian Minister for Commerce, 600 truckloads of coal per day are wanting through the strike at Petroszeny alone. The transport crisis has reached its maximum. The workers openly refuse to obey the orders of the administrative officials of the militarised enterprises. They threaten the commandants and officers with the fate of the colonel at Pecs, whom the soldiers killed with their rifle-butts. The repressive measures undertaken in the case of one individual workman, who had been arrested for a statement of this kind, served as the immediate cause of a strike in the uo