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Revolutionary essays
Image 23
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Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 23. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/632

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 23, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_022.jpg
Transcript toi live on. But 1 am very sorry for you : how can you all manage to live on a quarter of a pound of bread? We, at any rate, are living in free Russia. What grieves me is not that 1 have to work in the depths of a pit, but that you are suffering. It's no good them writing in the papers that we've still got enough bread—we don't believe it! We know very well that not everyone is starving—Count Tisza and other gentlemen are not going hungry, of course, but the soldiers' wives and children are. Their fathers, after shedding their blood, have been left to suffer in Siberia, while the children, thanks to* the lords and ladies, are starving. Oh yes, the workers can perish; so long as Count Karolyi, Lukacs, Kraus, and others can fill their pockets, it doesim't matter to them what happens to the wives and children of the men who were torn away from their families at the very beginning of the war to defend their "king and country." Now everybody's eyes are being opened, though. The capitalists can trumpet abroad as loudly as they like, that the Hungarian soldier was defending his fatherland : there aren't many who will believe it. Why don't they make peace? The Russian soldiers have all come back from the front. But the capitalists' pockets, I suppose, are not yet full enough, and so they've got to fight to the last Hungarian soldier. I know it all, and so do others !" This is the letter of a "latter-day revolutionist." Here is what workers write who at home took a more or less active part in the proletarian movement; two metalworkers from Budapest, at present employed at Liinovka Station (Voronezh Province), who happened to receive one number of a newspaper published in Hungarian : "Your respected newspaper, after passing through hundreds of hands, has reached our remote little hamlet, where a few prisoners of war, amongst them Hungarians, are leading a monotonous existence. We read with great interest every line of the paper, and with every word there rose Within us undying hatred and desire for vengeance—vengeance for those who have suffered agonies and poured out their blood on the fields of battle. . . . We longed for peace, and looked forward to returning. . . . But where shall we return ? . . . You are quite right to say, honoured comrades, 'from captivity to prison.' But no, we cannot be blinded by 'defence (21)