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Revolutionary essays
Image 22
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Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 22. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 22. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/631

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 22, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_021.jpg
Transcript Naturalisation into citizenship of the Russian proletarian State is a result of the influence of the revolution, although in some cases that naturalisation was prompted not by revolutionary motives, but by a kind of Nazarenism. A mere passively-resisting attitude towards the predatory aims of the imperialists—mere horror—does not represent the awakening of revolutionary consciousness. But that is not the reason to which we can attribute facts like the events at Neriansk. There, during the course of several days, five hundred Magyar proletarians and workers became naturalised as Russian citizens, and united against the counter-revolutionary bands of Semenov. Amongst these revolutionary volunteers are many who, at home, never took part in the Labour movement; and it is only the Russian revolution that has given them their Socialist education. Those who have participated in the propagandist work of the Social-Democratic parties cannot but agree that the educational significance of the revolution has attained unprecedented proportions. Revolutions are the locomotives of history; not only in the objective sense, but also in the sense of their rapid development of the minds of the workers, within whom there takes place a process of deliberate re-examination of all previous values. In this connection the letters received at the editorial and other offices of the foreign groups of the Russian Communist Party are not without interest. We shall quote a few passages from these letters to illustrate the educative influence of the proletarian revolution. They were received by the newspaper "The Social Revolution," the organ of the Hungarian Communist group. Here, for example, is the letter of a working man—of a miner. He is writing to his wife at Budapest, and sending a copy of his letter to the editorial office. In Hungary he belonged neither to the Labour Party nor to a trade union. He is now living at Kolchugina, in Siberia. He writes to his wife, inter alia : "I received your past-card from Budapest, saying- you had sent me ioo kronen. I haven't received them; but it doesn't matter, as I am working here and can earn enough (20) ii rail ■IiUhH S ■■■