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Revolutionary essays
Image 20
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Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 20. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/629.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 20. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/629

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 20, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/629.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_019.jpg
Transcript by means of the surplus value squeezed out of debtor States is considerably thinner than in Germany. It was there, therefore, that German militarism first gave the order to desocialise minds. The pamphlets about the Bolshevik Government disseminated by the Ministry for War amongst the ranks of the Austn>Hungarian Army, represent an attempt to paralyse the influence of the Russian proletarian revolution. As for the prisoners of war, the government of the Dual Monarchy has had to give up all hope of them. The Government is so occupied by the struggle with internal collapse, it has become indebted to such an extent, that it has neither time nor money to spend on using these "spiritual"1 methods with the prisoners of war. Austria's only resource in this respect is the system of punishment camps which await all those returning from captivity; but hundreds of soldiers escape from these camps back to Russia, Ukraine, the Caucasus. , Germany, however, is a "cultured country" and a creditor State. Germany has both money and "spiritual" weapons for the struggle with the Bolshevik poison. She has not yet lost all hope of reforming her returning prodigals. The German prisoners of war are not less infected, but Germany is in a condition, at any rate, to create an apparatus for desocialising them. The so-called "Chief German Commission," staying at present in Russia, has already been entrusted with the task of desocialising minds. It has brought with it informational material. The productions of German militarist literature will co-operate with the work of counter-revolution, with the object of restoring "voluntary" discipline, and, to quote from military regulations, the "self-reliance" of the troops. If this is insufficient, gallows and bullets will be forthcoming, to desocialise for all time those minds which do not lend themselves to correction. The diplomatic intervention of German imperialism hitherto relied on could, it is true, bring about alterations in- the organisation of revolutionary agitation a*mongst the prisoners of war, but it was not in a position to prevent the revolutionising of minds. For this it would have been necessary not only to destroy the Revolution, but also to shoot the prisoners themselves. (18)