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Revolutionary essays
Image 15
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Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 15. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/624.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 15. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/624

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 15, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/624.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_014.jpg
Transcript I. After the revolution alike in Marx's philosophical world- concept and in his views on the material conditions of social production, he shook himself free of the last vestiges of Liberalism. "The Poverty of Philosophy," from the economic aspect, and "The Communist Manifesto," from the political aspect herald the final liberation of Socialism from the last lower middle-class swaddling clothes. The founders of scientific Socialism had not had as yet the experience of a revolution, but by the path of theoretical analysis they had even then succeeded in establishing the fact that, in the progress of the revolutionary movement, the lower middle-class can display itself only as a reactionary and Utopian factor. This lower middle-class—as "The Communist Manifesto" proclaims—"stands half-way between the proletariat and the capitalist class. Being a necessary complement of capitalist society, this class is constantly being reborn." Composed of extremely mixed elements of the pre-capitalist epoch—the so- called "toiling intelligentsia," the lackeys of the capitalist class—this class was to be found, in France, ini Switzerland, and to a certain extent in Germany, at the advanced posts of the revolution] of 1848. According to "The Communist Manifesto," the Communists were to support the various party groupings of these elements, while the latter were in opposition, understanding clearly, however, that if the representatives of the lower middle-class were really revolutionary in sentiment, it was orily when faced with their immediate descent into the ranks of the proletariat. These hopes of the lower middle-class, little sanguine though they were, nevertheless were completely shattered : the revolution of 1848 clearly revealed the political bankruptcy of the revolutionary section of the bourgeoisie. That revolution laid bare not only their weakness, but also how dangerous they were to the work of the revolution. During the French revolution of that year, the proletariat was crushed, not by the capitalists, but by this very lower middle- class. "The small shopkeeper," wrote Marx in "The Class Struggle in France," "rose up and moved against the barricades, in order to restore the movement from the street into (13) HHHBSHB ■Ml