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Revolutionary essays
Image 9
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Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 9. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 9. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/618

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 9, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_008.jpg
Transcript situation, as the dictatorship of Count Tisza will be to help the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. These circumstances, on the contrary, are the best possible pledge that the Russian proletarian Republic is not waiting in vain for the international revolution. ... In Austria-Hungary the crisis has matured. The Monument at Penza. ("Pravda," April 28th, 1918). Far from the London cemetery with its grave covered by a plain stone slab, there has been erected, in the depths of the first proletarian State, the first monument to the first thinker and champion of the proletariat—the first public monument to Marx. "Let us turn to Russia. The Tsar was placed at the head of European reaction. To-day he is a prisoner of the revolution, and Russia is in the front rank of the revolutionary movement in Europe." These words, taken from the introduction to the second Russian translation of the Communist Manifesto, published under the supervision of Marx and Engels, have now passed into reality. Though continuing but painfully in the great struggle, surrounded by a ring of the imperialist executioners of all countries, the proletarian Republic remains the living proof of the truth of the Marxian teaching. All the distorters of Marxism, traitors to the work of the proletariat in Russia as in Western Europe, the social- traitors and Mensheviks of all shades, are following the progress of the revolution, and the work of the organs of proletarian dictatorship, gnashing their teeth. But the proletariat, erecting a monument to Karl Marx, has left behind these semi-revolutionaries; and now this first stone monument is a splendid and visible demonstration of the fruitful propagandist work of the Communist Party in Russia. However high the cultural level of the German or French proletariat, the scientific theory of the class struggle has not entered so deep into their soul as it has in Russia. Even if the mass of the Russian proletariat was as "dark" as the leaders (without followers) of social-democracy are screaming in impotent fury, yet, in the task of awakening (7)