Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Revolutionary essays
Image 7
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. Revolutionary essays - Image 7. 1920. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/616.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939. (1920). Revolutionary essays - Image 7. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/616

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kun, Béla, 1886-1939, Revolutionary essays - Image 7, 1920, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/662/show/616.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Revolutionary essays
Series Title International socialist library, 15
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kun, Béla, 1886-1939
Publisher British Socialist Party
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1920
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Socialism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Austria
  • Hungary
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 46 pages; 18 cm.
Original Item Location HX256.K84
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304436~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1028723_006.jpg
Transcript REVOLUTIONARY ESSAYS. A New Centre of Infection. ("Pravda," April 26th, 1918.) Not long ago Count Czernin, the former Austrian Minister for Foreign Affairs, was formally repudiating territorial annexations at the expense of the Russian Revolution. At that time the disturbances in the Austro-Hungarian monarchy were only beginning. The frightened ruling classes of the Danubian monarchy were then still having recourse to methods which were successful, up to a certain point, in disguising the dissolution of capitalism. Since that time, however, Austria-Hungary also has become a nest of revolutionary infection. The German Imperialists are now not only imposing their quarantine on the Russian frontier: they are defending themselves against the revolutionary bacilli drifting in from amongst the peoples of Austria-Hungary. The note of the German Government demands the isolation of German prisoners of war, not only from Russian Soviet agents, but also from the "allied" Austrian and Hungarian prisoners. In the eyes of the German Government, the subjects of the Hapsburg Monarchy now in Russia are one mass of "infection." The German Imperialists have become aware of a new danger—a danger arising from an "allied" country, and portending revolution nearer home. The revolts in Austria-Hungary are now not problems of the future, but questions of the day; they are not isolated hunger riots that blaze up here and there, but harbingers of revolution, steadily making their appearance in all corners of the monarchy. The ground has been splendidly prepared for revolution, despite the fact that the official Social-Democratic Party has completely abstained from taking part in these risings. Germany is daily making new impossible demands on Austria- Hungary; the broken Monarchy cannot satisfy these demands; and the German Imperialists are treating it in exactly the same way as the "great" Powers before the war treated Turkey. (5)