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One year of revolution
Image 32
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Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). One year of revolution - Image 32. 1918. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/409.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). (1918). One year of revolution - Image 32. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/409

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.), One year of revolution - Image 32, 1918, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/409.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title One year of revolution
Alternative Title One year of revolution: celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the Russian Soviet Republic, November 7, 1918
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.)
Publisher Socialist Publication Society
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Brooklyn, New York
Date 1918
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir Ilʹich, 1870-1924
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English; Russian; German
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages: illustrations; 28 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.S62 1918
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304499~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 32
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_6770052_031.jpg
Transcript revolutionary masses in Petrograd demonstrated against Milyukov, the Provisional Government, and all imperialistic aims. As a consequence of this and other pressure, Milyukov and others were compelled to resign, and on May 18 a new Provisional Government was organized, a "coalition government" which contained representatives of the revolutionary democracy, of the Soviets,—coalition being accepted against the violent protests of the Bolsheviki. At this stage, a bourgeois revolution had been definitely accomplished, not by the bourgeoisie, but by the proletariat, who momentarily, however, allowed the bourgeoisie to usurp power. It was a political revolution. But with this change at the top, there was a movement at the bottom, an elemental bursting forth of the revolutionary activity of the people. This activity alone, destroying and reconstructing fundamentals, could accomplish the Revolution. The revolutionary masses had constituted as instruments of revolutionary action their Soviets, of Workers, of Soldiers and of Peasants,—the self-governing units of the organized producers, completed forms of the "sections" and "communes" of the French Revolution. These Soviets constituted the only real power; but under the influence of the moderate Socialists, all power was yielded to the bourgeois Provisional Government. The Soviets were class organizations characteristic of the proletarian revolution; under the pressure of revolutionary events, they usurped powers of government, developing from exclusive instruments of revolutionary action into instruments of revolutionary government. The moderate Socialists, under the guidance of the Mensheviki (representing the dominant opportunistic Socialism) and the Social-Revolutionists, wanted to degrade the Soviets into a "parliamentary opposition"; the revolutionary Socialists, represented by the Bolsheviki, wanted all power to the Soviets, a revolutionary government of the Soviets alone. This was the decisive struggle of the Revolution,—the struggle between the bourgeois Provisional Government and the developing proletarian government of the Soviets. The world concerned itself much with the attitude and proposals of the politicians during these early days; but the decisive events of the Revolution were being prepared by the masses. The bourgeois political tendency, which aimed simply at a change in the forms of government, enthroning the bourgeois republic and bourgeois supremacy, was superficially dominant; but the real factor was the economic revolutionary tendency of the masses, which aimed at a complete annihilation of the old regime and a reconstruction of the industrial system. This was apparent in the peasants seizing the land, in spite of the prohibitions of the Provisional Government; this was apparent in city after city, where,even at this early stage, the Soviet usurped the functions of government, in the workers electing Shop Committees to control factory production, and seizing factories closed down by owners as a measure against the Revolution. The Provisional Government, being bourgeois, paltered on the land question, since confiscation would be inimical to the interests of the bourgeois peasants, capital and the banks; the Provisional Government, being imperialistic, had to dodge and bluster about the war and the purposes of the war, and lie about peace while continuing to wage war; and the Provisional Government, being capitalist, had to protect the interests of the capitalists in all vital measures. The old bureaucracy had been retained; and all progressive measures were sabotaged by these hang-overs of the old regime, as the capitalists sabotaged production. The crisis developed more acutely; the revolution had only begun. But revolution is the great educator and developer of class action— temporary reverses created a new opportunity. Czarism having persisted beyond its historical necessity, its overthrow found the proletariat highly developed, much stronger than the bourgeoisie; the breach created in the old order, by the momentarily joint attack upon Czarism, provided an opportunity for the revolutionary proletariat, directing the poorer peasantry, to break through for action and the conquest of power. Revolutionary Socialism seized the opportunity. The bourgeois-"Socialist" coalition government did not improve matters: the crisis dragged along miserably and agonizingly. Words instead of action, promises instead of accomplishment, reaction instead of revolution—this was the course of events, supplemented by starvation and disorganization. Victor Chernov, Social-Revolutionist, was compelled to resign from the Provisional Government, because his measures to prevent 30