Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

One year of revolution
Image 26
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). One year of revolution - Image 26. 1918. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). (1918). One year of revolution - Image 26. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/403

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.), One year of revolution - Image 26, 1918, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title One year of revolution
Alternative Title One year of revolution: celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the Russian Soviet Republic, November 7, 1918
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.)
Publisher Socialist Publication Society
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Brooklyn, New York
Date 1918
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir Ilʹich, 1870-1924
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English; Russian; German
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages: illustrations; 28 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.S62 1918
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304499~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 26
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_6770052_025.jpg
Transcript The Old and the New Arthur Ransome in his ''Open Letter to America" is using as a motto the following words of Emerson: "If there is any period one would desire to be born in,—is it not the age of Revolution; when the old and the new stand side by side, and admit of being compared ; when the energies of all men are searched by fear and by hope; when the historic glories of the old can be compensated by the rich possibilities of the new era? This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it." The old and the new stand side by side in Russia, and admit of being compared. The new can well stand the comparison with the old. But there is one condition—the new must be freed from the calumnies and the exaggerations indulged in by the supporters of the old, and the old should be remembered such as it actually was. "The Soviet regime remains in power only with the help of indiscriminate terror." "Lenine is executing his political opponents by the thousands." "Peters, a tool of Lenine and Trotzky, is signing death warrants without looking at the names of those who are sent to their death." Such is the daily food distributed by the press about Russia. When Count von Mirbach, the German Ambassador, was assassinated, the news agencies reported that more than 500 members of the Social Revolutionary Party, including the old revolutionary worker, Maria Spiridonova, were summarily shot by the Soviets. "The Grandmother of the Russian Revolution," Catharine Bresh- kovskaya, was reported thrown into prison by the Bolsheviki, and that she died there of privation and sorrow. A few days ago I saw a man, not a Bolshevik,—not even a Socialist,—who recently returned from Russia, having left Moscow in the latter part of August. He admitted that during the period from April until he departed, about twenty people had been actually executed by the Soviets,—for reasons which under similar circumstances would lead to execution in any other country in the world. No one was executed indiscriminately. AIL had a fair trial, and all were absolutely convicted of ruthless plotting against the safety of the country in times of stress. But Maria Spiridonova was not among those executed. She is still alive, although she is kept detained,— not in a vile prison—but surrounded with such comforts as the Russian workers are able to get for themselves. Catherine Breshkovskaya has never been imprisoned by the Soviets. When she died,— not of privation, but of old age,—the Soviet Government, although she was its opponent on many questions of tactics and principles, gave her a public funeral and hundreds of thousands of Moscow workers, members of the Soviet, turned out to pay their respects to "The Grandmother of the Russian Revolution." Peters, depicted by the capitalist press as a brutal and murderous monster, is nothing of the sort. Recently I met a man who had lived for many years together with Peters. His personal recollections of the many gentle and humane acts done by that alleged monster impressed me much more than the wild, obviously invented and impossible newspaper stories about Peters' mass executions. Let us admit, though, that even having eliminated all the obvious lies and exaggerations there still remains on the debit side of the Russian proletariat revolution many acts of stern reprisals and punishment, which bear out the well-known saying that a revolution never can be a pink tea-party attended by people dressed in evening clothes. But let us then compare the new with the old. Not to speak of the hundreds of thousands of victims of the Czarist regime who one by one were killed or tortured in the prisons of Siberia, let us remember a few of the instances of mass terror during the old regime. The murder of more than three thousand people at the Chodynka festival, during the coronation of Nicholas the Bloody, is not forgotten nor the "punitive expeditions" of the revolutionary period of 1906-1907, when thousands of peasants in Southern Russia, in the Baltic provinces, and in Siberia were massacred by the agents of the armies of the Czar. The workers of the world also have not forgotten the Lena massacres in 1913, when hundreds of striking workingmen were shot to death. Nor do the workers of the world forget that res- 24