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One year of revolution
Image 21
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Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). One year of revolution - Image 21. 1918. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/398.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). (1918). One year of revolution - Image 21. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/398

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.), One year of revolution - Image 21, 1918, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/398.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title One year of revolution
Alternative Title One year of revolution: celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the Russian Soviet Republic, November 7, 1918
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.)
Publisher Socialist Publication Society
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Brooklyn, New York
Date 1918
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir Ilʹich, 1870-1924
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English; Russian; German
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages: illustrations; 28 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.S62 1918
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304499~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_6770052_020.jpg
Transcript The Spirit of Internationalism It is a strange experience to be cast down into a country of one hundred million internationalists. In America an advocate of any State measure must answer primarily the question: "How will it benefit the interests of my country?" In Russia, in this, as in most other matters it is quite the reverse. The question that the champion of any measure there has to answer is: "In what way will this measure benefit the interests of the working class of America, England, France, Germany, and the rest of the world ?" For example: When the agricultural department of the Russian Soviet Republic was considering the purchase of harvesters and other implements from America it wanted to assure itself that these articles would be made without sweated or ruthlessly exploited labor. It was ruled that no machinery would be received in Russia which did not bear the "O. K." of a committee of American Socialists. Many critics of the Revolution speak flippantly of this Internationalism of the Russians as only "skin-deep," denying that the peasants and workers had any grasp upon the real content of the word and that they merely repeated it like the other catch words of Socialism. These are the same critics who said that Socialism itself in Russia was only "skin- deep," that the Soviet Government could last only two weeks or two months, that the Bolsheviki were solely destructive agents without creative or administrative abilities and that the countryside would rise en masse to hail the advent of the Allied armies. But this whole crew of villifiers of the Russian working class have been discredited by the facts. As they were wrong in those dismal prophecies so they are all wrong when they reckon lightly the hold of Internationalism upon the minds and hearts of the Russians. It was elemental and spontaneous, the most colossal fact in a revolution full of colossal facts. A striking instance of this occurred when Reed and I spoke on the day for Socialists from foreign lands. It was in the dead of winter, a bitter cold day, when we came with a procession streaming across the Troitsky Bridge. Between the minarets of the blue-domed Mohammedan Mosque and the shining golden spire of the Church of Peter and Paul, lay the new Cathedral of the proletariat. It was a great, low, rambling, gray bordered structure called the Cirque Modcrnc. There was a black mass of people jammed up against the entrances. "Why don't they open up and let the people in?" I asked as we passed the crowd and entered a back passage into a great, black cavern. It was a huge pit, dug out of the earth with hundreds of girders to support the monstrous, arching roof. But we could see neither the floor nor the roof nor the seats in a wide sweep rising tier on tier around the arena. In fact we couldn't see anything at all, as, guided by Kollontai, we stumbled through the dark, damp passages and up some stairs and came out upon a few, rough boards which served as a platform. There was no light in the place because that day there was no coal in Petrograd. "Why don't they open the doors and let the people in?" I repeated. "There are fifteen thousand here already," Kollontai replied, "and the place is packed to the roof!" The deep silence made that statement incredible. A candle was lighted so that the face of the speaker might be visible—a tiny flicker in the dark. Kollontai said: "Go ahead, speak!" It seemed foolish to talk to the vast void. But in a venture of faith, I raised my voice and blindly flung my words out into the night. "Comrades! I speak for the American Socialists, Internationalists!" Like a blast from the pit came an explosion of fifteen thousand voices: "Da sdrastvooyet International." (Long live the International!) 19