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One year of revolution
Image 16
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Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). One year of revolution - Image 16. 1918. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/393.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). (1918). One year of revolution - Image 16. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/393

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.), One year of revolution - Image 16, 1918, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/393.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title One year of revolution
Alternative Title One year of revolution: celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the Russian Soviet Republic, November 7, 1918
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.)
Publisher Socialist Publication Society
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Brooklyn, New York
Date 1918
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir Ilʹich, 1870-1924
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English; Russian; German
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages: illustrations; 28 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.S62 1918
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304499~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_6770052_015.jpg
Transcript is to halt the triumphant march of the proletarian revolution—and the proletarian revolution shall not be halted!' It is a smooth "steam-roller" that the Bolsheviki have set in motion. In Russian political meetings all the real work is done outside the hall, in the caucuses of the different "fractions." The Bolsheviki are in the majority. They cannot check the voice of the minority; there are no rules by which debate can be closed. But they have resolved upon an insurrection of the masses of the people; they know that the Petrograd masses are behind them; they believe that all Russia is behind them ; and they drive ahead, ruthless and sure. It is after midnight. Lenine, in a calm, monotonous voice, is reading his appeal to the peoples of all the belligerent nations for armistice and peace. The audience listened intensely, and the sweat stands out on their foreheads as they listen, so terribly do they will it. He ceases. Protests come, a few met with ugly growls and shouts of "Enough! Shut up!" A vote. Even the "moderates"—the Left Socialist Revolutionaries and the Novaia Zhizn group—are in favor. There is only one objector. A storm of rage and laughter compels him to lower his hand. Simultaneously, with one thought, without a word, we are on our feet, all of us, singing the Internationale. It bursts up through the cloudy air, penetrates the walls, the windows, and goes soaring out into the world at war. Men embrace each other; tears run down rough, bearded faces; a deep exaltation shakes us. Peace! Peace and a people's world to all mankind. The beginning of the general revolutions, the end of unhappiness, the birth of a world! "And let us not forget those who have died for this night!" cries a voice, when the last notes have died away. Then we sing the Funeral Song of the Martyrs, that solemnly joyous hymn that means so much to every Russian. A profound conviction seizes us that this is not merely an emotional demonstration, but the sublimation of real political power. Do we feel that the people have won? Hear Lenin: "The Revolution is only just begun. Now we have conquered Petrograd. Tomorrow we shall conquer Kerensky. The day after tomorrow we shall break the resistance of the bourgeoisie. And then, comrades, we shall begin the Revolu- A.' " tion. . . . Hear Trotzky: "And now, to work, comrades. Everything must be done—everything. There is a new world to build. It has taken untold centuries to build this one. We must build ours in a few days." The new Government is proclaimed, a "Government based on the Soviets of Workers', Peasants' and Soldiers' Soviets." The Council of People's Commissars is named from the tribune, each name being greeted with applause appropriate to its revolutionary associations; Trotzky's calls forth sharp, tumultuous cheering—the response to Lenine's is thunderous and steady. But the proclamation of the new Government, which in the West would be the climax of Revolution, is here received in a matter-of-fact way. Here the crowd is ruler. Men do not matter; only the Revolution matters. Were Lenine and Trotzky for one moment to fail to interpret the will of the crowd, they would be swept into oblivion, as Kerensky was, as, for example, Riazonov was to be. . . . It is after five o'clock in the morning when we leave. In the more southern lands dawn would be paling the eastern sky; here for four hours yet it will be black night. Snow has not yet fallen, but the black mud of the streets has frozen rigid. At the corners squat little groups of Red Guards around brightly- flaming bonfires. They call to us, "Da stras'vuyet swob&dni Rossi!", their eyes shine, and their voices are full of inexhaustible excitement. Street-cars are waiting to take us downtown. Long ago, at eleven in the evening, the car-service in the streets of Petrograd has stopped; but the Street-Railwaymen's Union sends cars which shall wait at Smolny until the Soviet breaks up, manned by volunteers. We pile in, still gesticulating, discussing . . . From afar comes the sound of a few casual shots. Behind us as we go great Smolny, all ablaze with lights, hums like a hive. . . John Reed. 14