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One year of revolution
Image 15
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Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). One year of revolution - Image 15. 1918. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/392.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). (1918). One year of revolution - Image 15. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/392

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.), One year of revolution - Image 15, 1918, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/392.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title One year of revolution
Alternative Title One year of revolution: celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the Russian Soviet Republic, November 7, 1918
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.)
Publisher Socialist Publication Society
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Brooklyn, New York
Date 1918
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir Ilʹich, 1870-1924
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English; Russian; German
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages: illustrations; 28 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.S62 1918
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304499~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_6770052_014.jpg
Transcript Hi t! I need them, why then remember, comrades, when we shall have won, they will crawl at our feet!" Inquiries as to when the meeting would be over are met with impatient shrugs. There is a feeling of exaltation, of effort keyed up and triumphant. Men look as if they have not slept for weeks, but their eyes burn. On the top floor in a little room the Military Revolutionary Committee sits sleeplessly, the center of far-flung insurrection. Couriers come running, couriers burst out, running. A deep, determined humming sounds from that room. We send in to find out if the presidium is there. As we wait my friend the anarchist explains his position "I am a follower of Kropotkin, yes. This is no time for a revolution. "There are no people to run a revolution. Why, the intelligentsia is against them! . . . . How dirty they are! How ignorant! What will Europe think of us?" The door opened and a figure comes out, a squat man with short bow-legs and a long trunk; wide face, mouth appearing to smile, straggly beard and young eyes and forehead; dirty, unkempt, drunk with loss of sleep; a plain uniform, with the insignia of an officer student, and the red-white-and-blue cord of a volunteer. "Krylenko!" says my friend, with a smile, and comes forward, holding out his hand and calling him by name. Krylenko, in a few hours to be Commander-in-Chief of all the Russian armies, looks at him keenly. "Don't you remember me?" asks the follower of Kropotkin. "I am Andre Pavlovitch. We were together in Minsk prison. . ." "Oh yes," answers Krylenko, with a pleasant smile, taking his hand. We go down the hall toward the meeting room. My companion is still complacently critical. "No finesse, no sense of the dramatic," he keeps saying. "How uncultivated we Russians are. Just savages. We shall be laughed at in Europe." * Now the Left Socialist Revolutionaries were come, weary but excited—Kamkov, Maria Spiridonova, Karelin, Kalagayev in the lead. In a moment the Bolsheviki, all crowded around Lenine—Zinoviev, Kameniev, Tchoud- novsky, Volodarsky; Riazonov a bitterly objecting minority of one. Then the presidium mounted the stage—these with Alexandra Kollontai, Martov for the Mensheviki-Inter- nationalists, Trotzky, a scattering of Mensheviks, Socialist-Revolutionaries, Abramovitch for the Bundf Kramarov temporarily for the Novaia Zhizn group. Kameniev presides. He reads the order of business, which was drawn up, as usual, by the presidium. This night the assembly is to take up the questions of War and Peace, the creation of a Government, the defense of the capital against Kerensky. But of course the order of business is only sketchily followed. The great debates, in which anyone may be heard, are broken into by all sorts of speakers on extraneous matters; by soldier delegates with greetings from their regiments at the front; by officers and intelligentsia protesting against the uprising; by wealthy peasants who have come to curse the Bolsheviki for arresting Minister Maliantovitch—"He too is a Socialist." A member of the Central Executive Committee of the Railwaymen's Union brings word that he and his men will oppose the Bolsheviki with all their power. Bitterly, furiously, the representatives of the other political parties, even the Left Socialist Revolutionaries, protest .against the arbitrary actions of the Bolsheviki. Karelin tells how the Red Guards have seized their printing shop and closed their paper, Znamia Trouda. The Bund delegates again publicly "leave this assembly of traitors." All night long the audience roars and stamps its applause and its anger; the hall tosses like a stormy sea. Motions are made to limit speeches to fifteen minutes, to half an hour, to an hour, to three hours, and are voted down. The delegates of the other parties protest against the make-up of the presidium, alleging that the overwhelming Bolshevik "fraction" should not insist upon dictating the whole course of the Congress, but ought to be more generous—to allow the voice of the minority to be heard. Trotzky responds, in a voice like polished steel, "When we Bolsheviks were a minority party last July, and begged you for generosity, you did not listen. Nor will we listen to you now. Your purpose 13