Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

One year of revolution
Image 14
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). One year of revolution - Image 14. 1918. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.). (1918). One year of revolution - Image 14. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/391

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.), One year of revolution - Image 14, 1918, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/414/show/391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title One year of revolution
Alternative Title One year of revolution: celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the Russian Soviet Republic, November 7, 1918
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Publication Society (N.Y.)
Publisher Socialist Publication Society
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Brooklyn, New York
Date 1918
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Lenin, Vladimir Ilʹich, 1870-1924
  • Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English; Russian; German
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 32 pages: illustrations; 28 cm.
Original Item Location DK265.S62 1918
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304499~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_6770052_013.jpg
Transcript The Second Day The meeting place of the Second All-Russian Congress of Soviets, is the former ballroom and reception hall, of Smolny Institute under the old regime a famous convent-school for the daughters of the Russian nobility, patronized by the Czar himself. A great white room, with two rows of massive columns, lighted by a pair of glazed-white chandeliers holding hundreds of ornate electric bulbs; at one end a dais, with two tall many-branched light-standards, and a great gold frame behind, from which the Imperial portrait has been cut. Here on graduation days and festival days had been banked brilliant military and ecclesiastical uniforms, a setting for some Grand Duchess. . . . A thousand chairs are ranked in the space between the columns. Most of the delegates are in the uniform of private soldiers. The rest wear the plain black blouse of the Russian workers, with a few colored peasant blouses. A few women. Rarely gleam the gold and red epaulettes of an officer, and an occasional white collar. All around, in the spaces between the columns, on the window-ledges, massed on the steps of the stage and on its edge, are the public—also common workers, common peasants, and common soldiers. Bayonets bristle among them. Exhausted Red Guards, girdled with cartridge-belts, sleep at the base of the columns. There is no heat but the animal heat of bodies, which stand in hoar frost on the panes of the long windows. The air is blue with cigarette-smoke and breath. Through this hundreds of faces are lifted in the direction of the stage, at whose back is bunched a cluster of red banners, lettered in gold. Flat, simple faces, unconscious and determined, faces tanned almost black with exposure in winter trenches, wide-set eyes, great beards—or perhaps the thin, hawk-like faces of Caucasians, or of Asiatics from Turkestan—and many with the sparse mustaches of Tatars. . . . All these faces turned one way, with an expression of unsophisticated and child-like interest. No self-consciousness visible, and apparently no thought that what is being done is in any way unique; just the look of peasants intensely concerned with a new and wonderful harvest. . . . The session was called for sixr o'clock in the evening, but it is now ten and the meeting is not yet opened. It is November seventh, the second day of the Bolshevik insurrection. The Land Decree has been passed, the Winter Palace taken. In the hall of the City Duma the counter-revolutionary forces are gathering—Mensheviki and Socialist Revolutionaries, as well as Cadets, Monarchists, the Union of Officers. Kaledine is reported to be on the move north, and Kerensky is marching from the front with five Cossack Divisions. . . . At the press table sits a well-dressed, attractive young intellectual, a Russian Jew, a follower of Kropotkin, who has been exiled in Paris for many years. He observes the crude, intense assembly with amused detachment, making witty remarks. It is incredible to him that these rough and ignorant people should think that they can rule great Russia. "Come," he says to me, in French, "I am bored. Let us appoint ourselves a committee to go and find the presidium, so that the show can start." As we go out, he adds, "Not that there is any particular hurry. These animals will be running for their lives in forty-eight hours." Now, twelve months later, this remark comes often to my mind. We go through the dimly lit vaulted corridors, thronged with the huge, hurrying shapes of workers and soldiers, and bitterly cold. To right and left are doors, placarded with the innumerable activities of the Soviets: International Section, Soldiers' Section, Office of the Isvicstia, Literature and Publication, Union of Democratic Military Men, Professional Unions, Factory Shop Committees, and the headquarters of the different political parties. Through the door of room 28, where the Left Socialist Revolutionaries were in session, rages mass-debate; the door is locked. Room 18, on the first floor, is the "Lenine Section"; a close-packed throng of several hundred Bolsheviks intently listening to Trotzky. Nobody seems to care whether we enter or not. Trotzky is saying, "Do not falter. Do not give way. When they ask to compromise, it is because they know the power is in our hands. If we , ! 12