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The Mexican people…
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Perales, Alonso S., 1898-1960. The Mexican people… - Image 1. 1929. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/perales/item/150/show/142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Perales, Alonso S., 1898-1960. (1929). The Mexican people… - Image 1. Selections from the Alonso S. Perales Papers. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/perales/item/150/show/142

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Perales, Alonso S., 1898-1960, The Mexican people… - Image 1, 1929, Selections from the Alonso S. Perales Papers, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/perales/item/150/show/142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Mexican people…
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Perales, Alonso S., 1898-1960
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Washington, D.C.
Date 1929
Description Unsigned manuscript fragment.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Mexican Americans
Subject.Topical (AAT)
  • activists
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Perales, Alonso S., 1898-1960
Genre (AAT)
  • typescripts
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2010-002, Box 8, Folder 9
Original Collection Alonso S. Perales Papers
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=436
Digital Collection Selections from the Alonso S. Perales Papers
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/perales
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note Permission to publish or reprint this resource must be requested from Arte Publico Press at https://artepublicopress.com/permissions/
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2010_002_b008_f009_001.jpg
Transcript r / ■/ The Mexican people also feel that in their daalings wit a us aa individuals their liner sensibilities have bean studiously insulted* She American people have never learned that court aoua and urbane treatment counte for sore with them than any other cor aid oration, and that our lack of policy in this regard was largely the foundation of tluir prejudice. The lesson we faile to learn in the Philippines, t .ough we had ample opportunity, was that the polite latin races were outzaged by the bruaque and aggresivo oonduat of the Anglo-Saxons. Generally speaKing, American criticism of the Kexioen peoplo oentuie araoax of thrift and impiovidsnce. The Moxioans of to-duy are a product of the cruel masters, who held them e of ignoranoe, serfdom and poverty ever slnoe the days of the Conquest, fox four long and grueling centuries the eon or laboring class has bean ruled by three dominant factors from wuioh taey could find no avenu* ofescane, the ohuxch, the government and the wealthy l&nSownoi cii uan ever shown a willingness to advance the a of the oomon people along the lines of e j civilisation. "Amuse the Xnaian but keep him ignorant and poor', has always been the slogan of the Mer.lcnn loaders towaxdl the peon or laboring class. jtrow lb£l until the imtSMflltlsa 01 Mexican Independence by apain. the history of Spanish America shows that "Bsw .-pain" waa siaply a monopoly that i ..: sing and privileged classes. After three centuries of smoldering discontent a reVv)lutlon broKo out. which lad to the establishment of the Mexican hepublio, with a change of masters but without a change of policy in I i«M olasfl. *he exception of rranoJ soo Madero. no ;ident has ever taken the interest of the lauoring class to heart, although they rep tenth of the population, though wealthy and a bom aristocrat In 1911, .iadeio started a movement whish would have revolutionise the sociological condition rl the Mexican people, had it not bean tor that brutal monster it aorta, who, under the pretence of friendly pratootioaw I had him cruelly assassinate , and there with the bras on v effrontery of a buccaneer asked President Wilson to recognise him as Maderols successor. It is |rue that our .innnl sh-Amorioan populstior, &£ the border States has not :ept pace with the ambltloua and hard driving Anglo-Saxons with v.bora they have lived since the ssmsioi •aritocy in 1848. In their dsiense v.-a must acknowledge that prHctioall; sgemant or assistance has ev, a red then tr-, tha national Ktate or coamtunity In whloh thay live up to ths pr sent time, while