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The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-11
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-11 - Page 1. February 11, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/995/show/991.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (February 11, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-11 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/995/show/991

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-11 - Page 1, February 11, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/995/show/991.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-11
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date February 11, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0649_L.pdf
Transcript Volume I, umber 3 I{ ey West Key West, Florida, is on the island of Key West, one of a group known as the Florida Keys. The Florida Keys are 60 miles southwest of Cape Sa­ble and 100 miles north by east of Havana, Cuba, thus making Key West the southernmo t of the cities of the nited State . The island is a flat island averaging eleven feet above sea level. Its geographical location, vegetation and climate supported a population which made it the largest city of the state in 1890 and even now it has 20,000 inhabitants. Its excel­lent harbor, an easy port to make, gives a steamer communication with the large cities of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Also it is the terminus of the Florida East Coast Railroad and the ocean ferry to Havana thus permitting a passenger and freight car service between Havana and New York via Key West. There is a naval base at Key West which during the Spanish American war was the rendezvous of the fleet but since that time has had little importance except for its strategic location controlling the coast and Car­ribean trade. There is little history attached to the island as the first permanent settlement was in 1822 though it has several buildings which were used as hospitals during the Spanish- American War, one of which is the convent of the Holy Name. The army has a small post, Fort Taylor, on an artificial island in the harbor at the main entrance. It is a good place to buy cigars, turtle and turtle shell ornaments. Its only other trade or industry is fish­ing. Yes, the fishing's good. AT SEA Houston Fighters At Guantanamo Our boxers and wrestlers gave good account of themselves in the matches of 29 January at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as evidenced by the results which reached us in Portsmouth. The best of cruiser division seven pitted themselves against cruiser division four representatives. Chick, our 118 lb wrestler, threw his opponent as soon as he could lay hands on him in the fast time of 15 seconds. He looks like a repeater for Fleet Champion. Buttler, our 145 lb entry, was ahead all the way until he had the misfor­tune to break a rib. The match on a default then went to the other man. Our sympathy goes out to this third division coxswain. He looked good. Hodge, the 145 lb boxer from our ship, won by the K. O. route. This did not surprise us in the least. Han- is, our 160 lb boxer, won by a technical knockout. Here's another hard hitting boy who should go to the top. Lewdanski, the heavyweight boxer, fought a great fight throughout, hav­ing his man down during one of the rounds. However, the experience of his opponent, the cruiser represen­tative last year, was too much; the result being that Lewdanski lost his bout by a close decision. Fine work. The entire ship is be­hind our fighters to the last man. They deserve everthing we can give them. 11 February 1939. Slaughter Among the Icebergs By GUS - Fourth and Final Episode .:.... ( The story continues with the leading aviator giving his impressions of the polar flight.) " The slightest suggeston that our search would end in failure must have seeped into my consciousness at this point because a dark wave of melon­cholia then washed over my being like an eclipse blotting out the light of day. It rendered me almost unfit for any lucid thinking. This would never do, I told myself. I had to fly on to search out the white carnivora. So much depended upon us aviators. I have never put much stock in the teachings of Coue or any of those philosophizing pedants so it was im­possible for me to have recourse to mere plain thinking. My remedy was action alone. With this thought in mind I sig­naled my intention to the other planes. All pilots performed flawlessly and the bearing line of the planes from the ship revolved slowly but perfectly to the new position. Almost simul­taneously came results. My sadness fled a if it were being pursued by greased lightning. Below us thousands of white bears lay lanquishing in the rays of the aurora borealis. They were bunched up lin large sE\ date g- roups with no show of action or evidence of their remarkable strength. This was the pay- off. I don't believe anyone could have found a sleeker and better conditioned group of bears either." Back aboard ship you can well i­magine the surprise and the joy that ( Continued on Page 2.)