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The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-02
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-02 - Page 1. February 2, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/986.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (February 2, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-02 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/986

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-02 - Page 1, February 2, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/990/show/986.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-02-02
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Norfolk, Virginia
Date February 2, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0646_L.pdf
Transcript Volume I, Number 2 Slaughter Among the Icebergs By GUS ( Continued from Last Week.) ~--~ Over and over again the peals of wild uncontrollable laughter and sobs floated from No. 2 messing compart­ment like the spasmodic wheezing of a dying asthmatic sufferer. Chaos beckoned. Now if it was anyone thing which the crew of our ship prided itself above all else and for which they had received many compliments through­out the fleet it was their incessant ability in keeping level headed thru any and all emergencies. Yet flesh and blood can endure so much. Where human beings are concerned as they were in this case the slender thread that supports the prop of reasoning began to weaken at an alarmingly fast rate. There could be only one remedy. The cause must be removed so action was paramount. A flying squad of corpsmen con­verged at last upon the hapless mess­cook and managed to lead him off to the sick bay where a straight jack­et prevented him from furthur harm­ing himself. This, however, did not hamper the style of his outcries. Something had to be done to effec­tively gag his almost inarticulate mouthings. The wise saying that ne­cessity is the mother of invention was aptly proven when a capable yeoman brought one of his brain childs into play. Saying that a gas mask had more uses than a cat had lives he rapidly fitted a mask to the messcook. The pitiful cries were thus at last silenced . and men breathed normally again. ( Continued on Page 2.) Norfolk, Virginia Robert Harold Christenson Robert Christenson of s:, lt Lake City was swept overboard on the night of 30 January. Each and everyone rememhers well the heartbreaking task of trying to locate his body in the face of the hurd­cane · likc winds and waves which were prevalent on that night. It suffices to say that all hands felt his passing more keenly than could ever be imagined. He was 8 good shipmate. Morc words are unnecessary. First American Fleet At the beginning of the hostilities, prior to the Revolutionary War, the Colonies carried on the war at sea by means of " privateers" or private ves­sels which were authorized to capture British merchant ships. This was a cheap method of waging war as the privateers were not paid salaries but given the entire proceeds from the sales of such ships as they captured. About 70,000 men in Massachusetts alone were engaged in privateering. In one year they captured over three hundred British ships. These privateers had an indirect effect on the results of the war, as they undermined English commerce and increased our standing among the other nations. However the priva­teers had little effect upon the mili­tary operations as they preferred capturing richly laden and poorly armed merchant ships to engaging men- of- war in battle. In order to protect their harbors, many of the Coloni€ jS estab\ isbed small navies of their own. This proved ( Continued on Page 4.) February 2, 1939 Impressions of Gonaives Gonaives, Haiti, with a " population of 8,000 negroes, is situated 65 miles north- northwest from Port- au- Prince, the capitol of the country. Its only manufactoring claim is the salt works although a mineral spring nearby is highly prized by its inhabitants. Gonaives, as cities go, proved to be about as attractive to a sailorman as a swarm of yellow jackets would be at a highland clan gathering. Al­though not possessing any of the desirable attributes of other towns and cities with which we are familiar nevertheless we found a few novel and interesting sights there. Probably the erect bearing of the negro women as they carried huge baskets of clothes on their heads was watched with admiration. Our women back home should take a tip from them provided they desire that grace­ful swing in walking. The dwellings, patched together with everything from brush to drift­wood, are painted blue and white. The paint, if it is paint, resembles a white- wash mixture of rather medi­ocre grade. Its pastel tints resemble nothing found in our country. Over the white graveled roads numerous small donkeys provide the chief means of transportation. To ride on one is a distinct experience one will never forget. Along these roads runs a long ditch which is used for everything from washing clothes to watering live stock. One thing for certain, one will nev­er forget Gonaives. No doubt all of Us are a bit happy that it isn't our lot to live there.