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The Blue Bonnet 1939-01-20
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-01-20 - Page 1. January 20, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/981.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (January 20, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-01-20 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/981

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-01-20 - Page 1, January 20, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/985/show/981.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-01-20
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Enroute Gonaives, Haiti
Date January 20, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0643_L.pdf
Transcript 20 January 1939. * 0.5.5. HOU$ TOII1( /~ Volume I, Number 1. 7 Enroute Gonaives, Haiti Boxing and Wrestling Finals Near WHEN Cruiser Division 4 lines up its champions against those of Cruiser Division 7 on 29 January the Houston will have the greatest num­ber of representatives from any ship. Chick, Arthur, Buttler and Fordem­walt will wrestle in the 118 lb, 145 lb, 155 lb, and 165 lb class weights respectively whereas Hodge, Harris, and Lewdanski will don the gloves in the 147 lb, 160 lb, and heavyweight classes. This is the greatest array of boxers and wrestlers that ever repre­sented the Rambler ship in the cruiser eliminations. Every man aboard should be behind these boys. They ought to go far. Let's give them the backing and praise they deserve. A friendly pat on the back or a well meant " good luck" will show them your appreciaton. Cruiser Divisions 5 and 6 hold their eliminations on 5 February. The win­nerS then clash for the cruiser cham­pionships and the right to proceed against the battleships on 25- 26 Mar. Fleet finals are on 1st and 2nd of April. When our ship leaves for Norfolk on 2nd of February it is contemplated to transfer our boxers and wrestlers to another ship within the division, probably the Pensacola. It will be no picnic for these men to know that they are being left behind while their ship is returning to the states for a short while, and due credit should be given them for representing our ship then. Fighters, every last one of them, they show their true sporting ( Continued on Page 2.) Slaughter Among the Icebergs An Historical Voyage of Mercy By Gus ( For all you unlucky readers who happened to miss the last edition of the Blue Bonnet and hence the grip­ping tale of " Slaughter Among The Icebergs" a brief resume is hereby given: The Houston while lying at anchor during the holiday season re­ceives mystifying orders from the Na­vy Department to get underway and proceed to the Polar regions to se­cure Polar bear meat. This meat is the only cure known for the strange disease sweeping the country. The crew and officers are finally mustered and the ship is made ready for getting underway.) The Story Continues Every last man aboard down to the lowest seaman turned to at double quick cadence in order to prepare the ship for getting underway. Especially was this true of the Aviation Cadets. They were head and shoulders above the others with their speed and vigor. Through it all nothing was left to chance. Men went to work quietly, efficiently, and quickly, seeming to know full well the terrible hazards of the weather in the Polar regions. Probably this was due to a large ex­tent on their training but no one can say that the noble purpose of the trip did not act as an additional stimulus in wringing from their bodies many ergs of work. Had not a particular boat cox'n shown remarkable forethoughtfulness probably a good share of the crew would have suffered most horribly ( Continued on Page 2.) Panama Canal Cost $ 510,901,364 Yearly Capacity of 17,000 T HE Panama Canal connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans through the nal'l'OW isthmus where the long Continental Divide, extending from Alaska to the Straits of Magellan, dips to one of its lowest points. In ancient geological periods there was a natural channel here but later the land rose and left the Isthmus as a natural barrier between the oceans. The line of the Canal goes up the valley of the Chagres River on the Atlantic slope passes through the Continental Divide at Gaillard Cut, and descends to the Pacific Ocean down the Valley of the Rio Grande. Following this route the Canal is 40.27 statues miles in length from shore line to shore line, and 50.72 miles from deep water to deep water. Passage of a ship through the Canal requires about eight hours. Since the Atlantic entrance is 33.52 statute miles north and 27.02 west of the Pacific entrance, ships passing from the Pacific to the Atlantic side travel from East to West instead of the opposite direction as would natur­ally be the course. Gatun Lake which was formed as a result of the damming of the Cha­gres River at Gatun Dam, has an area of 163.38 square miles with a shore line of 1,100 miles when the sur­face is at its elevation of 85' above sea level. It is second largest artifici­ally formed lake in the world, exceed­ed only by the lake formed by Boulder Dam. IContinued on Page 3.)