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The Blue Bonnet 1938-09-29
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-09-29 - Page 1. September 29, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/933/show/929.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (September 29, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-09-29 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/933/show/929

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-09-29 - Page 1, September 29, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/933/show/929.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-09-29
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Dillahunt, H. E., printer
  • Swiderski, S. J., printer
  • Schick, C. H., printer
  • Owen, D. W., printer
  • Rakowski, J. T., printer
  • Foltz, E. L., printer, Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Surratt, R. W., printer
  • Thomas, E., printer
  • Elliott, J. E. Jr., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date September 29, 1938
Description Volume I, Number 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 2
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0607_L.pdf
Transcript Volume I, Number 1. FLEET AIR REVIEW Friday, 23 September 1938 10,000 legionnaires came out to the ships of the fleet from tel'minal island and were welcomed aboard and shown in most cases a little of the Navy life for the first time in their lives. Yes, they had crossed the Atlantic but in crowded convoys and had only seen the Navy as represented by the con­voy escorts, destroyers. Friday was different. Shortly after coming aboard they were escorted to the messing com­partment and given a chow just as the Navy eats it. Ham, the first helping delicious and tender, the sec­ond, well, a good salad, fine beans, and excellent spinach followed by a pumpkin pie. After chow all went topside to see the battleships come into the harbor en masse screened by destroyers of the new types, not at all like the flush deck four stackers of the war IJeriod though a few of those were present. Timed perfectly so that there would be no drag of interest with the an­choring of the battleships the planes appeared from the northward with Admiral Earnest King leading the ' irmada of 409 planes, an assemblage of planes from the Lexington, Sara­toga, Ranger, Battleships, Cruisers, and Patrol planes from San Diego. They flew over in a demonstration of mass strength and then took station for attack on the anchored fleet. The HOUSTON was the point of initial attack being the flagship and the source of primary command. The fleet was promptly screened from the sea by a white smoke screen laid by planes. From the north at about a ( Continued on page 4) Long Beach, California. SHIP IS BACK HOME AGAIN Houston Rests After Long Cruise Back home again! That phrase means a lot to all of us. It means a lot to those who left their families, wives, or sweethearts back at home here in Long Beach. It means a lot to be settled again with some definite plans ahead instead of hanging breathlessly for word concerning our future movements. We'll all remember that cruise though. Remember when we sent a landing party ashore at Clipperton with the sharks following the boat like a herd of wild pigs at feeding time? Then, nobody can ever forget the battles between the shellbacks and pollywogs long before the ship ever got near King Neptune's do­main. Sure, everybody had fun. We even laughed a little inwardly about the Baroness and her lovers. Why, we ask ourselves, did the Baroness and her companions ever select such a lonely, barren group of island as the Galapagos as their trysting place? There was plenty of work on that cruise. Gun drills from morning till night. Today, we are glad we got the opportunity of all that drill as we feel more assured than we ever have that there will be some high scores for short range. But, it seem­ed, that we just had time to turn our caps around and relieve ourselves for another drill. Perhaps, a quirk of fate gave us the most humorous yet pathetic in­cident during the trek from ocean to ocean. Some of us sent for our wives as the ship layoff Norfolk, only to ( Continued on page 4) 29 September, 1938. HOUSTON AGAIN HONORED AS FLAGSHIP U. S. FLEET Again the H 0 U S TON becomes " the ship" of distinction and choice of executives. Living up to her re­putation as the Rambler ship she returns to become the flagship of the U. S. Fleet. During the last few days the Commander- in- Chief, U. S. Fleet has come aboard bringing one hun­dred forty- one men; three attached to the aviation unit, fifteen chiefs and one hundred twenty- five men. Chief Aerographer Woods was with us on the Presidential Cruise and had asked to remain on board until CinCus arrived but had to leave to return with the staff. Including the Admiral nineteen more officers are on the ship despite the fact that the administrative part of the staff was not brought along. Monday, the nineteenth of Sept­ember, the motor launches of the Pennsylvania started coming over with the equipment and the office gear that was necessary for opera­tion. Admiral Bloch and the other officers came over without ceremony in order not to interfere or slow down the work being done on the ship during transfer. By that after­noon though not ready for perfect operation the system was function­ing well. The arrival of CinCus aboard allows of a rather interesting obser­vation i. e., flags flown from the main mast during the last twelve months. The ensign, Panamanian ensign, the President's flag, the four star flag of Admiral Bloch, the three star of Ad­miral Tarrant, and the two star flag of Admiral Anderson flown during his inspection the Saturday before CinCus arrived have all been at the main.