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The Blue Bonnet 1938-08-08
Page 4
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-08-08 - Page 4. August 8, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/928/show/927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (August 8, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-08-08 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/928/show/927

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-08-08 - Page 4, August 8, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/928/show/927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-08-08
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W, C., cartoonist
  • Partridge, A. M., circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Enroute Pensacola
Date August 8, 1938
Description Volume VII, Number 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 2
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 4
File name _0606_L.pdf
Transcript Page 4. AFTER ENGINE ROOM CRIME WAVE NIPPED IN \ BUD Gregson smelled a mouse the other day when he made a complete check of the trash buckets in the after engine room. His careful check re­vealed that one bucket had strayed from its usual resting place. Gregson hastily organized himself as a committee of one to investigate its strange disappearance. He buck­led on his trusty flashlight, establish­ed himself in the vicinity of the tele­phone booth in the engine room which is in the immediate vicinity of the crime and upon establishing communi­cation with all parts of the ship set out an air tight drag- net. His only request was that the coffee pot be kept hot. As a preliminary check, all avail­able buckets in the engine room were examined and the fonowing facts were ascertained: That the bucket bearing the name of Cardinelli had not been removed from its rack for the last six weeks. That Slodek, upon being shown a bucket testified that he had seen a similiar article in the bilges during our stay in the yard. A search of the indicated bilge pocket revealed that the bucket was still there. Working on a theory that the buck­et might have drifted to the boat shop, one, Pat Patterson was closely questioned. He readily admitted hav­ing such an article and pointing to a circular object in a corner said, " that should be it." Examination showed the designated article to be a large piston. As the investigating committee left Pat Patterson was wondering which engine to operate on first, and also bemoaning the fact that all the engines were operating so quitely that it was impossible to tell by the sound which piston had been replaced by the bucket. McCarthy came forward with the information that shortly after his arrival on board there had been a bucket in his fireroom. A search of this fireroom brought to light one bucket and one skeleton. Examina­tion showed the bucket was really a beer growler from a local saloon and it has not · bepn determined yet wheth- THE BLUE BONNET er the bones are those of a bilge rat or a fireman. At this point Gregson while stating that he was yet not defeated in his quest declared that he would first get some needed sleep before investi­gating the powder magazines. Flash! Flash! As we go to press it has been dis­covered that Gregson was sitting on the bucket during the entire investi­gation. BATTLESHIPS There are 15 battleships organized in four divisions, each of which is commanded by a Rear Admiral. When all divisions are operating together a Vice Admiral, Commander Battle­ships United States Fleet, commands the entire group. Battleships are the backbone of the fleet. This is the type around which a fleet is built, all other types being considered as contributory. Although contributory, these other types are necessary. In designing the battleship the naval constructor strikes a balance between the machinery weight which governs speed, armament weight or striking power, armor weight or protection against damage which might be in­flicted by an enemy. There must be a give and take a­mong the above three elements. If one is to be increased, the others must sacrifice something, unless the size or displacement of the ship is to be in­creased beyond all reasons. The battleship is the strongest fight­ing unit; it can deliver the hardest blow; it can take more punishment than any other type and still remain afloat. It must be capable of engag­ing any vessel it may encounter upon the high seas; and it is to enhance its effectiveness and improve its oppor­tunities that all of the smaller types of men- of- war must cooperate. Mod­ern battleships are capable of speeds up to 21 knots and mount guns as large as 16- inch. The oldest battleship is the AR­KANSAS, commissioned 17 Septem­ber 1912, and the WEST VIRGINIA, commissioned 1 December 1923, is the latest battleship in our Navy. U. S. S. Hou6ton 7- 26- 38- 900 RAT PLEA All sailors like tu go ashore After dey been at sea But ven in ) Jort, our gud ship's rats Ain't gat no liberty; Ay tink our rats ain't treated sqvare For when the ship ban moored Dey put tin collars on da lines Tu keep da rats aboard. Our rats stand vatches in da bilge And never make a fuss Ay never know a Houston rat Tu even growl or cuss, Dey du deir duty plenty gude And du it qvite like; By Yimminy, if Ay vas a rat Ay tink Ay start a strike. In Panama our poor rats Ain't never see da beach, Ve moor da ship by big varehouse Vich ban yust out of reach; Iy ain't blame our deserving rats For gatting plenty sore; Next time lets leave dose collars off And let dem go ashore. P. S. All rite, Okay, if yu insist Ve keep a rat restricted list. SOURCE OF NAVAL TERMS Origin and definition of a few of the many terms formerly peculiar to sea- faring men only; are listed below: Douse the Glim- now slang ashore, was once good English afloat. Douse here means to lower or slacken, the reference is to the practice of lower­ing the lantern into an empty pail so that it could not be seen. Dungarees- now a part of miladY's beach costume, are sea- going work­ing clothes. The word is of Hindu origin. Fairway- originally a naval term meaning navigable channel; now it's a golf term. Figurehead- this was an ornate carved wooden figure placed at the prow of a vessel and supposed to bring good luck. Gadget- derived from a French word meaning a small hook, was applied to a lot of different small articles aboard ship, also called chick­en fixings, gill guys, wim woms, or timmy noggies.