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1938-08-08
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1938-08-08 - Page 2. August 8, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/928/show/925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 8, 1938). 1938-08-08 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/928/show/925

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

1938-08-08 - Page 2, August 8, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/928/show/925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 1938-08-08
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Date August 8, 1938
Description Volume VII, Number 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Enroute Pensacola
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 2
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0605_L.pdf
Transcript Page 2. -; THE BLUE BONNET ;- A weekly publication of the ship's com­pany of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Execu­tive Officer. Editor Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald Assistant Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Associate Editor: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SKlc Associate Editor: W. J. Bannen, Sea. Ic Cartoonist; W. C. Ridge Circulation: A. M. Partridge, Flc With all the interesting things happening to the ship and comple­ment each and every day of this cruise a booklet depicting the events graphi­cally with a log, and illustrating with pictures should be II treasured souven­ier of every hand aboard. Such a cruise booklet is now in the making. The Chief Engineer, The Chaplain, the Editor of this sheet have been appointed as a committee; they with the assistance of DeBri, Thompson, Ridge, the printers and others are now actively engaged in assembling and publishing the book. Some other ships have heretofore published cruise pamphlets which told of the happenings on their cruises, but it is being planned to far outdis­tance their attempts. These publications will be made available for all hands by the time of our return to Long Beach ( Prob­ably a slight charge will be made to help with expenses involved), and if it is found later that the response merits more copies, a second edition will be run off. HE SMILED He Smiled - and his home was a place of happiness. He Smiled - and the children ran out of their way to greet him. He Smiled - and his co- workers in business worked better than in any other place of employment. He Smiled - and followed the smile with a brotherly handclasp; and those who were discouraged and downcast went out and took a new grip on life and their work. He Smiled - and while the years rolled on, he grew younger, because - HE SMILED. THE BLUE BONNET THE PANAMA CANAL Of rapturous interest to every young Navyman is his first trip through the Panama Canal or " Big Ditch" as it sometimes is called. Sit­uated in the midst of the tropics amid luxuriant tropical jungles, haze- filled valleys and high mountain peaks to­gether with the lazy indolent air of the natives, makes this monstrous engineering feat one of the super­attractions for any world tourist. But thousands of U. S. Navymen travel through this canal each year, with stopovers at the scenic cities of Colon and Balboa, where traces are still visible recalling the conquest by the Spaniards in the fifteenth century and the later ransacking of Old Panama by ' Morgan the Pirate.' The Panama Canal is considered the world's greatest engineering feat. The cost of construction was $ 338,000, 000. The first survey for an Isthmian Canal in Panama was made by the Spanish in 1543. Two French com­panies made an attemp to build the Panama Canal but both failed, one in 1869 and the other in 1902. The United States took over the construction of the Panama Canal in 1904 and the first ship passed through it in 1914. The United States has use and occupation for all times of a strip of land five miles on each side of the center line of the Canal. For this the United States paid Panama $ 10,000,000 in cash and pays annu­nally the sum of $ 250,000. The cities of Panama City and Colon are with­in the five mile limit but are excluded from the agreement. The distance by airline from the Atlantic to the Pacific side of the Isthmus is 34 miles, by railroad 47 miles and through the Canal 51 miles. The Canal runs north- west by south­east. The Pacific entrance to the Canal is 27 miles east of the Atlantic entrance which causes the sun to rise on the Pacific and set in the Atlantic. There are three sets of locks in the Canal which are flooded and emp­tied by gravitation from water fur­nished by the Gatun Lake which, prior to the construction of Boulder Dam at Boulder City, Nevada, was the largest artificial lake in the world. The overflow from this lake also fur­nished the power by which the locks and the electric mules tow the ships through the locks are operated. DIVINE SERVICE t DIVINE SERVICE All hands are cordially invited to attend on Sunday. The ship's orchestra will furnish splendid music as usual. The Chaplain will discuss problems of impor­tance to everyday living. " I was glad when they said to me Let us go unto the House of the Lord." NO GOLD UNCOVERED AT COCOS ISLAND ( From Page 1.) be shipped, the ease with which wild foul could be taken, the abundance of coco- nuts, and the absence of human inhabitants sufficiently ac­counts for its popularity. In 1793 and 1795 Colnett came to the Island on an investigation cruise to determine its suitability as a stop­ping place for whalers in that region. As long thereafter as whaling was profitable in nearby waters the Island was used by the British and American whalers. In 1818 and 1819 Benito, alias Ben­nett Graham, was reported to have secreted treasures there rifled from the churches of Peru, and later aug­mented these from other raids which brought the total to eleven million dollars. In 1826 William Thompson who learned his trade from Benito hid twelve more millions on the Is­land. There have not been less than a dozen organized efforts to find these treasures. It is rumored that one company recovered a few hundred thousand. All the rest have ended in heart- breaking failures. This trea­sure hunting started as early as 1841 and has continued to the present day. Costa Rico, the owning country, has on hand a waiting list of would be searchers. If the treasures were hid near the water in those early days it is estimated that they would be now fifty or sixty feet under water. All one has to do to undertake the search is to obtain permission from the Costa Rican government and pay for the help of ten soldiers and an offi­cer from Costa Rico. How about it?